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Tuesday, July 28, 2015
  • Monday, July 27, 2015 11:18 PM

    Wow, where did the summer go? Oh yeah, it pretty much floated away down Sugar Creek this summer with all the rain we have had.

    Nonetheless, starting next week, real practices begin for the fall sports. That’s right athletes the point in the year you all dread is near . . . Two a day practices!

    Two a day practices are brutal, the athletes work incredibly hard trying to prove themselves to coaches (at least they should be). Coaches, of course, know who has been putting in the effort all summer long and those athletes that work the hardest usually excel.

     
  • Monday, July 27, 2015 11:09 PM

    Notes scribbled on the back of a Wright Brothers Overland Stage Co. Concert poster . . . 

    The good folks at the Hoosier State Press Association are partnering with all-around good guy Dave McChesney and his 1Up Software Company to create a first-of-its-kind motorcycle ride for newspaper folks (including readers) from anywhere in Indiana.

    Why should you care – besides the fact that you are currently one of those aforementioned newspaper readers? Because the whole thing begins right here in downtown Crawfordsville.

    Here’s the scoop. 

     
  • Vein trouble leads to swollen legs
    Sunday, July 26, 2015 6:42 PM

    I’ve seen quite a few people lately suffering from swelling in their legs, most caused by problems with their veins.

    To understand how problems with the veins develop, I have to provide a brief anatomy and physiology lesson. Fresh blood that contains oxygen and nutrients is pumped from the heart via arteries to the legs. The blood then moves across very tiny blood vessels called capillaries – this is where the oxygen and nutrients move out of the blood into the surrounding tissues. Waste products and carbon dioxide then move from the tissues into the capillaries and then into veins for the trip up to eventually reach the lungs, liver and kidneys where the waste products are removed.

     
  • Friday, July 24, 2015 9:18 PM

    Rosie Lerner, an Extension Consumer Horticulturist at Purdue University, has given the following home, yard, and garden tips to keep in mind!

    HOME (Indoor plants and activities)

    Take cuttings from plants such as impatiens, coleus, geraniums and wax begonias to overwinter indoors. Root the cuttings in media such as moist vermiculite, perlite, peat moss or potting soil, rather than water.

    Order spring-flowering bulbs for fall planting.

    Cut flowers from the garden to bring a little color indoors or dry for everlasting arrangements.

     
  • Wednesday, July 22, 2015 11:33 PM

    Before the ins and outs of the 2016 presidential contest become a preoccupation for many of us, it seems a good time to step back and look at the office of the presidency for which so many candidates are vying. The presidency inherited by whoever wins next November will be substantially changed from the position his or her predecessors occupied a few decades ago.

    The President is now the chief — and sometimes the sole — actor in American government. He far outweighs the other so-called “co-equal” branches. The media covers the White House extensively, and the other branches much less so. People don’t expect Congress or the Supreme Court to solve the country’s problems. Instead, they look to the President for initiatives, for remedies, and increasingly — and sadly — to serve as a de facto pastor to the nation when we confront a tragedy.

     
  • Wednesday, July 22, 2015 11:33 PM

    2015 marks the 95th Anniversary of ratification of the 19th Amendment granting American women the right to vote. Throughout the year, the League of W omen Voters is celebrating various highlights of this anniversary.

    The campaign for giving women in America the right to vote began at First Women’s Rights Convention which convened on August 19, 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York. The women who organized this significant event started the effort that would take 72 years before final ratification.

    The LWV of Indiana sponsored a “Go See Seneca Falls” trip July 9 through 12 to visit key locations in this long effort. Sue Fain and Gail Pebworth represented Montgomery County LWV on this trip. The two early major leaders of women’s rights were Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. These two with very different backgrounds had complementary skills and together built a strong national suffrage movement. 

     
  • Wednesday, July 22, 2015 11:30 PM

    Over the years, especially since the Internet became prominent and widely used, my own ideas have received a lot of challenges. Some of these come from people with different positions on this or that but quite a few actually come from people who find advancing theories to be mistaken. They often just wish to pick and choose from among the innumerable ideas circulating and find fault with formulating a system or general position. They champion adopting the smorgasbord as the model for how one ought to think about the world. Rhyme or reason are shunned as somehow obsolete, old fashioned and instead a hodgepodge of ideas is favored, never mind internal contradictions, inconsistencies, etc.

     
  • This week’s guest went from dancing to shelving
    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 11:22 PM

    What a talented young lady I met at the library where we spent a couple of hours together. Dance was her forte, having started at age five with dance lessons and acrobatics. She went through the sixth grade with lessons under Mrs. Cooper at the Masonic Temple and followed Bobby Hess awhile. Then there was none. Frustrated, she and Jane Sparks discussed creating a business to teach dance and the spark ignited. They held their lessons at St. Bernard’s and recitals at the 4-H building. Every Saturday and weeknights she and Jane led dance. She giggled, “Well, we weren’t no Dance By Deborah.” Certainly, it wasn’t like today as they had record players and rented outfits, but they did choreograph their own shows and I was just wowed by the memories she had made. Yet, she said, “But, I love the memories I’m making now!” And, Kathie Conrad Watkins is racking them up, big-time!

     
  • Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:56 PM

    I’ve gained a few pounds since my school days.

    Throughout high school, I consistently bounced between a 30 and 32 inch waist. Then, all throughout my time at Wabash College, I was able to wear the very same pairs of jeans I wore in high school. Heck, I even put on some muscle, thanks to the weight room at the Allen Center.

    Then something happened . . . I graduated. I joined “the real world,” as my parents always said. I got a job, got bills and responsibilities, got busy and ultimately got new jeans. Bigger ones. The move from 32 to 34 then on was pretty hard, but I think going from being able to run an eight-minute mile with minimal effort to stopping to catch my breath after one flight of stairs was worse.

    If only there were some way I could change that, some way I could challenge myself . . .

    That’s right, I’ve decided to join what I’m calling “Season 2” of The Challenge!

     
  • Tuesday, July 21, 2015 10:55 PM

    Many of us remember the TV commercials starring Orville Redenbacher. He was always seen in his striped shirt and bowtie.

    “Hi, I’m Orville Redenbacher from Valparaiso, Indiana,” he would say.

    That line rankled some folks who knew he was born in Brazil, Indiana, a town that had a Popcorn Festival dedicated to his memory each fall.

    For the past several months I have been corresponding with one of his grandsons, Kevin R. Fish, an author who contributed to “Indiana’s 200,” to be published by the Indiana Historical Society in November.

    In one of our exchanges, Kevin wrote the following and gave me permission to make liberal use of it in this column:

     

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