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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:22 AM
    Music gives me life. That one four-word sentence sums up my philosophy about music. I could go on all day and create other aphorisms about how much music means to me. I might as well do so. Music puts the air in my lungs and the food in my stomach. Without music, I am dead. Music is my best friend. Without music, my life is incomplete. Without music, silence is my only companion. Why am I rambling on about how much I love music? Well, it all started in English class.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:21 AM
    On any normal day, I have plenty of things to fill my schedule. I have school. I have television. I have my cell phone. I have my iPod. I have so many things to do that I sometimes have difficulty choosing just one. I guess you could say that Henry David Thoreau would find my life quite appalling for its lack of simplicity.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:21 AM
    So my teacher had the audacity to hand out a paper saying that we either had to go a weekend without technology or do a big project. Well, I'm not too enthusiastic with projects or school work, so I quickly made up my mind that going a weekend wouldn't be that hard. But I was sadly mistaken, like I'm sure the rest of my peers were. Wow, was I mistaken! I know that it should be true that mind can triumph over matter, but I guess my mind just isn't quite ready to take on the challenge of being deprived of electronics.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:20 AM
    A weekend without technology, how was I going to survive? The only time I ever go without television, cell phone, and computer is when I am grounded, so am I being grounded by my English class? When I first told my mom about the project, she was all for it; and somehow I knew I wasn't going to be one of the kids coming back to school bragging about how I got to watch TV, use the computer, and cell phone.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:19 AM
    For three days I went without the lifeblood of American society: technology. Three days without a phone, television, computer, video games, and the radio. Now, some people may see this as an easy feat, as I did at first. But I soon realized (approximately five minutes after I arrived home to an empty and utterly silent house) that it was not going to be as easy as I had previously anticipated. You may wonder how I survived those three uneventful days without technology, and I would answer with one word. Barely.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:18 AM
    So I walk into school on Friday morning dreading what is getting ready to happen. Our teacher, after having us study Thoreau for a week, decides that for a class project we should go without technology for a weekend. My first question: "Is this optional?" My teacher's answer is, "You can either do this or the alternative project that will take you all weekend anyway." So he left the choice up to me, and I, being the stereotypical teenager decided, to opt for less work. This weekend surely can't be that hard.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:17 AM
    With the passing of each year the dominance of technological marvels and devices in our society increases more and more. I thought I understood this. I was sure of it. Of course electronics have a tight grasp on our lives; and its grip continues to grow stronger, but this thought had been conveniently pushed to the back of my head for quite some time. Consequentially I refused to ever consider myself to be a "text-oholic."
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:17 AM
    This past weekend I learned just how technology both positively and negatively affects my life, and I believe this knowledge allows me to draw conclusions on the overarching effects of technology on the society and world in which we live. Those living in my generation are constantly exposed to technology; in fact; I would wager that on any given day 90% of students possess some sort of electronic device on their person.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:15 AM
    My teacher created this assignment where we would have to go without technology for an entire weekend. I tried to use all the technology I could before it was taken away. I was extremely worried about what this weekend would be like without it. What was I supposed to do with myself? Would the universe explode? Technology is a HUGE part of my life and going without it is not in my routine.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:15 AM
    I went into this past weekend prepared for enlightenment. I was convinced I would find a deeper appreciation for life. As the weekend came to an end I found that my hypothesis had been correct. I came out thinking about a few things I'd not before pondered.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:14 AM
    My main question is this: How did human beings just like me survive without electronics before the devices were created? Throughout my weekend without electronics, I realized that my entire life revolves around objects that need an outlet or batteries. I found myself feeling bored and lonely. The devices that I have used everyday for many years were suddenly taken away for 72 long, miserable, revealing hours and I didn't know what to do with myself.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:13 AM
    An English teacher's transcendentalist experiment led a class of high school juniors to accept that, regardless of their previous opinions, many of us are very much depend on today's technology. The project was to refrain from using common conveniences such as computers, cell phones, TVs, or pre-recorded music. All the items that we find so necessary and so regular became outlawed for a 72 hour time period. Those hours once spent watching, listening, engaged with, or fiddling with the different media suddenly became vacant and quit.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:12 AM
    So this past weekend I got to experience a few days without any electronics or technology for an English class project. I wasn't sure what to expect, but I knew it wouldn't be good. I am so incredibly attached to my phone and my music that without them I would just feel kind of alone. I felt like I was hardly a part of the world because no one could get a hold of me and I couldn't reach anyone.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:09 AM
    Teenagers today get a bad rap. With all of today's technology being shoved in our faces, it's no wonder that technology can dominate our lives. And yet it seems that nobody else is embracing the new century like we teenagers are. It's not like this is the first time: parents and elders rarely approve of the current craze, be it listening to ragtime, ear piercing, or exposing that little extra scandalous bit of ankle. So why is Facebook, Twitter, or, more importantly, texting such a big deal? It's my personal opinion that today's teenagers have been dealt a raw deal and that parents and other adults need to lighten up a bit.
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  • Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:04 AM
    Tick, tick, tick. Tock, tock, tock. As I sat in my living room alone last Friday, my ears were inundated with the sounds of the countless clocks in my house. Because I wasn't allowed to use electronics that entire weekend, I couldn't use a television or iPod to block the noise. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn't stop thinking about how each clock's 'ticking' and 'tocking' come at different intervals. Tick, tick, tick. Tock, tock, tock.
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