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Friday, August 18, 2017
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  • Thursday, August 17, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    As the debate continues on wind farms, county commissioners have stated they are reviewing the existing ordinance for possible revisions. Based on my read, the commissioners may want to consider the following.
    Currently, noise level shall not exceed 60 decibels at the nearest primary structure of business or personal use. By comparison, EU standards require a noise limit of 40 decibels to nearest primary structure and 35 for schools. Also, the World Health Organization states that any noise above a 55 decibel level is detrimental to sleep and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. 
    Current setback requirements are 1.1 times the height of the tower or about 176 feet for a tower with a height of 160 feet. As another point of reference, EU requirements are between 1,640 and 1,840 feet. 
    The required decommissioning financial surety is based upon an estimate that is net of salvage and scrap value, both of which can fluctuate wildly. The county will incur substantial legal and management fees which may not be recoverable through the surety. Perhaps the surety should be based on gross cost plus the recovery of county costs for default. And if I understand correctly, the participating landowner has no risk as the county will take over decommissioning in the event of default. Why?
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, August 17, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    Camp MoCoRobo, a project of the Montgomery County Leadership Academy, wants to thank its many supporters for another successful year. Thirty-five middle schoolers used LEGO Robotics to design, build, and activate their robots at Ivy Tech Community College this summer. Thanks goes to WalMart Optical and CSI Closures for the very interesting field trips, presentations, and lunches. Thanks, too, to Nick Frye who demonstrated the drone he uses for agriculture, and Dave Campbell showed the drone from Emergency Medical Agency that is used for locating missing people and other emergencies. 
    Thanks also to: 
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, August 17, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    I would like to propose the 1st Annual Donald J Trump Dumpster Fire. The event will be used to sacrifice by fire those malicious and hateful symbols of racism and bigotry found in such tangible items as Confederate flags, KKK robes and paraphernalia, and any Nazi souvenirs or memorabilia. A dumpster can be set up in a local park and all of the civic minded residents of Crawfordsville and Montgomery County can bring their hateful trash to a central location for appropriate disposal of this otherwise toxic waste.
    Those inclined to prayer or chanting can ring the Trump Dumpster and aid in the overt destruction of symbols of our hateful past and try to envision a kinder future, where individuals are judged on the content of their character rather than the color of their skin.
    I am sure president Trump will waive any environmental regulations concerning this burning of toxic waste and will deny that it contributes to global warming and climate change which he claims doesn’t exist anyway. So let’s go. Begin collecting all of your old Klan robes, Stars and Bars flags and your swastikas and keep reading the local newspaper to see when the 1st Annual Trump Dumpster Fire will stop smoldering and really ignite.
    0 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:21 PM
    Dear Sen. Boots:
    For the third time, HSPA worked with Speaker of the House Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, to pass language that would guarantee the public’s ability to obtain public records via email with no copying fee, although the bill also created a search fee for voluminous records requests (those that took more than two hours to find the records).
    Gov. Eric Holcomb vetoed H.B. 1523 due to the search fee, which should put the search fee to bed for the rest of his term – following a similar veto by then Gov. Mike Pence after the 2016 session.
    HSPA had worked with Rep. Bosma on multiple ways to limit the impact of a search fee - $20 cap on hourly rate, first two hours of search would be free, computer run time not included, review and redaction time not included. 
    As government records move inexorably towards digitization, HSPA believes free emailed copies of electronic public records would benefit Hoosiers more than a search fee would have hindered public access.
    0 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, August 08, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    Why are wind farms being planned/developed all across the US and even in more populated areas such as northern Montgomery County? Is it electrical demand? Is it cheaper to generate? No, it’s mainly the tax credits.
    Warren Buffett has admitted as much. In 2014 he explained: “I will do anything that is basically covered by the law to reduce Berkshire's tax rate [. . .] We get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms. That's the only reason to build them. They don't make sense without the tax credit.” (from an article in the “Hill” by Grant Kidwell, “Iowa wind farm generates more tax credits than electricity”, 10/6/16).
    0 comment(s)
  • Monday, August 07, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Rep. Negele
    The Hoosier State Press Association thanks you for authoring H.E.A. 1272. The bill allows government units to proceed with a meeting when newspapers fail to publish notice, by posting notice in the community. Sen. Blake Doriot, R-Goshen, was the bill’s Senate sponsor.
    HSPA’s position was based on equity. It would be unfair to punish government units to force them to reschedule meetings when the fault was with the newspaper for failing to properly publish the public notice advertisement.
    The House passed the bill, 95-0, and the Senate, 45-3. Gov. Holcomb signed the bill into law on April 5.
    HSPA also thanks you for supporting H.B. 1523.
    For the third time, HSPA worked with Speaker of the House Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, to pass language that would guarantee the public’s ability to obtain public records via email with no copying fee, although the bill also created a search fee for voluminous records requests (those that took more than two hours to find the records).
    Gov. Eric Holcomb vetoed H.B. 1523 due to the search fee, which should put the search fee to bed for the rest of his term – following a similar veto by then Gov. Mike Pence after the 2016 session.
    0 comment(s)
  • Friday, August 04, 2017 8:56 PM
    Dear Rep. Brown:
    The Hoosier State Press Association thanks you for supporting H.B. 1523.
    For the third time, HSPA worked with Speaker of the House Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, to pass language that would guarantee the public’s ability to obtain public records via email with no copying fee, although the bill also created a search fee for voluminous records requests (those that took more than two hours to find the records).
    Gov. Eric Holcomb vetoed H.B. 1523 due to the search fee, which should put the search fee to bed for the rest of his term – following a similar veto by then Gov. Mike Pence after the 2016 session.
    HSPA had worked with Rep. Bosma on multiple ways to limit the impact of a search fee - $20 cap on hourly rate, first two hours of search would be free, computer run time not included, review and redaction time not included. 
    As government records move inexorably towards digitization, HSPA believes free emailed copies of electronic public records would benefit Hoosiers more than a search fee would have hindered public access.
    0 comment(s)
  • Friday, July 28, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    The American People DID NOT ELECT YOU TO REPEAL AND REPLACE ObamaCare with another GOVERNMENT HEALTH CARE PLAN!
    If you save one word of Obamacare you have failed the American people. The people want the entire bill repealed, period! Remember when you had insurance through your employer? Remember when your husband or wife was included on your policy? Remember when your entire family could be covered with a deductible of your choice and co-pay? Remember group plans? Hard working middle class Americans. These are the people that were told, "You can keep your Health Care Plan! You can keep your doctor! Your monthly premiums will be cut in half!") Let's remember what it was like to have Family Health Care! ObamaCare removed insurance coverage for your spouse, and sent them on to the government website to pay $1000 - $1800, a month for insurance, with NO Dental, Vision, or Prescription Drug Insurance. No one can afford these prices for Health Care. So, people went without Health Insurance and paid penalties for not having insurance or for not buying the level of insurance mandated by the government. Let's all remember that those who voted for AHCA without ever taking the time to READ IT FIRST, NEVER ENROLLED IN The OBAMACARE PLAN and claimed their staff could not afford it! So we need to make it Crystal Clear. Repeal ObamaCare! Step Away from Our Health Care. NOT INTERESTED in another Government Health Care Plan!
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, July 26, 2017 4:00 AM
    Fellow Hoosiers,
    As I’ve traveled across Indiana these past weeks, many of you have asked me about the federal health care debate. You want to know how legislation may affect us, especially those who rely on Medicaid, our HIP 2.0 program or the federal insurance exchange. You’ve asked about the potential gaps that could be created by reducing federal funding.
    Last week, we saw two separate publicly reported estimates about the impacts of Senate legislation that were $5 billion apart. By tomorrow, there could be other reports with completely different numbers. As I write this, there are rumblings of a potential vote this week. The point is, no one yet knows what the final legislation will contain or whether there will even be agreement to bring a bill to a vote at all.
    Here’s what I do know.
    1 comment(s)
  • Friday, July 21, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    I am with the Montgomery County Historical Society in Crawfordsville, Indiana. I have an inspiring story for your readers. This story is inspiring because our committee of the Montgomery County Historical Society, Tower Committee, has been working for 21 years to restore the Clock Tower to the Historical Victorian Montgomery County Court House. We will continue to work on this project until the tower stands proudly on the top of the Montgomery County Courthouse. Many of our committee members are older retired people who are showing extreme efforts to see this project through. The average age of the members is probably about 80 years old! 
    The courthouse and the tower were erected in 1876 but the tower was removed in 1941 because a painter reported the tower was leaning. It was War time and there was not money to see if this was true and it was hastily taken down. Dr. James Marion Kirtley, a local doctor, came home from the War on leave and discovered the tower was missing. He grieved over that fact as the clocktower was a part of him. He vowed he would someday restore a tower to the most important building in Crawfordsville. However he was to deliver over 5,000 babies, serve as a county commissioner, and the State Senate, and had little time to work on his project.
    0 comment(s)
  • Friday, July 21, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    I am puzzled by the recent letters to the Editor criticizing the efforts to return a clock tower to the County Courthouse. Most communities find pride in the overt demonstration of productivity and civic concern displayed by architecturally appealing public buildings. One can see a picture of all 92 Indiana County Courthouses at the Indiana Courthouse Square web site: http://indianacourthousesquare.org/courthouses/
    Looking over the other Courthouses it is evident that our Courthouse fits in as being one of the more modest 19th Century buildings. The original clock tower was an integral part of the design of the building from an aesthetic perspective. The removal of the tower changed the entire look and feel of the building, similar to cutting the roof off you car with a chainsaw just so you can have a convertible. You then have a convertible that is functional but rather ugly and not consistent with the original designers vision.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, July 19, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    If you are in business, any competition or in opposition, you watch and learn who opposes you and what they are doing. Four or five years ago there was a big invitation-only meeting held by those interested in county-wide zoning. A hush-hush meeting that became known. Since then I have been told many times those wanting zoning are just waiting for what they think is the right moment. Along came the windmill farms and up popped zoning.
    We “no-zoners” thought we had proven we don’t want zoning and for good reason. We had a very large percentage in the rural area particularly against zoning, no zoning signs county-wide, south unit billboard, Chamber of Commerce survey 74 percent against zoning and the political election went well for no zoners. We must remember to vote in the next county election.
    If Crawfordsville and any small towns that are incorporated are exempt from county-wide zoning, who is left? It’s the rural area. The rural area residents are the ones affected by the county-wide zoning and certainly should have a strong voice concerning the zoning. After knocking on many rural Montgomery County doors a few years ago and still talking with rural residents, there is no doubt in my mind that the no zoners are a majority in the rural areas.
    1 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, July 18, 2017 8:49 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Over twenty years of cross country driving, I’ve seen the landscape change in a number of ways. One of the most noticeable changes has been the proliferation of wind farms. 
    Along Interstate 40 in Texas and Oklahoma, wind turbines stretch in every direction as far as the eye can see. Texas produces the most wind power of any state, reaching 23 percent of total electricity production in the first quarter of 2017. The senate bill that propelled Texas to top wind energy producer was signed into law in 1999 by then Governor Bush, allowing Texas farmers and ranchers to earn income from wind turbines on their land, creating clean energy at an affordable cost while growing local rural economies.
    Wind farms supply 25 percent of energy in Oklahoma. With some of the best wind resources in the US., and many new wind farms under construction, Oklahoma is striving to become a manufacturing center for turbines and towers, and several state technical schools have programs to train and certify workers in repairing and servicing wind turbines.
    Iowa and Kansas have also made huge gains in wind energy, with Iowa producing over 36 percent of it’s energy from wind, and Kansas producing around 30 percent.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:55 PM
    Dear Editor,
    I have a simple question. When the World Health Organization establishes “Guidelines for Community Noise” acknowledging “Critical Health effects” with on-going noise in outdoor living areas at 50/55 dB(A) (decibels) for a time limit of 16 hours, outside bedroom windows at 45 dB(A), school and outdoor playgrounds set at 55 dB(A), sleep disturbance levels is 30 dB(A)- why then, has the county established a wind ordinance at 60 dB(A)- above “critical health effect limits”? (This doesn’t consider health effects by low frequency vibrations (infrasound)- an additional issue.) Please make health of the citizens a priority. Please change the ordinance to safe levels. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:54 PM
    Dear Editor,
    I would like to thank all of the businesses that supported our Summer Reading Program this year at the Linden Carnegie Public Library. Thanks to their generous donations we were able to provide exciting and fun programs and also give away great prizes to all of our readers!! Thanks to Random House, HHSB, Lorraine Wilkins & Family, Clark Truck Equipment Co, Inc, Nucor, The Mitchell Agency, Wrede Rock, Applebees, WCI Farms, Pizza Corner, Blankenship Auto Care, County Market, Shear Heaven (Tammy Brummett), Farmer-Forbes & Family, Little Caesar's in West Lafayette, Fugate Lawn and Landscape, Dairy Queen, Kroger South, and Arni’s.
    A special thanks to Valero Ethanol and Mary Broadstreet! They provide our library with prizes, food and so many other goodies it is impossible to list! They are amazing to us and we are so grateful! 
    0 comment(s)
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The Paper of Montgomery County,
a division of Sagamore News Media

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