Friday, November 26

Columnists

Butch thankful for these simple things
Butch Dale, Columnists

Butch thankful for these simple things

Butch and brother in tub By Butch Dale At this time of year, most of you remind yourself of the things in life for which you are thankful. I have been guilty, as perhaps some of you are, of taking some aspects of my life for granted at times. But as cold weather sets in each year, I always become more appreciative and remember to thank the Lord for the following: A WARM HOUSE The house that I grew up in was very cold in the winter. Those of you who grew up in an old farmhouse know all about this. We had a small fuel oil stove in the living room and a smaller stove in the kitchen. On a cold and windy day, the temperature downstairs might be in the upper 50s in some of the rooms. My brother and I slept upstairs, and the only heat that reached there was through a small floor vent. W...
The gift that keeps on giving: 4-H
Columnists

The gift that keeps on giving: 4-H

By Abby Morgan I can’t believe that the month of December is almost here. With the hustle and bustle to find the perfect gift for family and friends, please consider giving the gift of 4-H to the youth in Montgomery County. Indiana 4-H enrollment is open to all youth in Montgomery County in grades K-12. While we do not have a hard deadline for enrollment, we like to have as many youth enrolled by January 15th. This helps ensure that families receive timely communication and learn about the various opportunities within the 4-H program. Enrollment is easy with our 4-H Online system (https://v2.4honline.com) and can even be done while you work on your online shopping! The mission of the Indiana 4-H Youth Development program is to provide real-life educational opportunities that dev...
Grumpy new man instead of a grumpy old man
Columnists

Grumpy new man instead of a grumpy old man

By Dick Wolfsie I’m about to turn 75. I’ve always wanted to be a grumpy old man. Over the years, I thought I had made a lot of headway in this area, especially in the getting older part, which is easy. I also found myself getting progressively grumpier, as well. Or so I thought. My father was a grumpy old man by the time he was 60 and I always admired my dad, so I aspired to be just like him. But I wanted to do it even sooner. Remember, 60 is the new 50. Or is it 50 is the new 60? Whatever. I first tried to be a grumpy old man when I was in my 40s. But sadly, people mistook my crankiness for wittiness. I complained to the manager at Kroger that their entrance and exit doors were on the wrong sides. “I’ll never shop here again,” I told him. “I don’t know if I’m coming or going...
This local soldier had one of the most unique funerals in our county
Columnists, Karen Zach

This local soldier had one of the most unique funerals in our county

By Karen Zach An interesting, but far too short of a life was that of John Clark Maxwell’s.  His desire was to serve his country and that he did in back-to-back enlistments. Born on a farm near Crawfordsville, he joined a large family with two full brothers, George and Ira (who died as a teen), three half brothers (Frank, Harry and Fred) and three sisters (Ellen, Mary and Clara Bell).  His father was a farmer but also did work for the county in various capacities, including assessing and one job of “road construction viewer.”  John was the son of John Clark Maxwell (whose mother was a Clark) and Catherine Pierce, his father passing at age 55 and his mother remaining a widow for 30 years before her death.  Oddly, John married Alva Glover (born 2 July 1879 in Fincas...
Lessons on running for office
Columnists

Lessons on running for office

By The League of Women Vot­ers Before the Indiana legislative branch received census data to redraw districts for the next decade, this League of Women Voters member sat down with Senator Phil Boots to discuss how to empower voters with more competitive district maps. We discussed how districts that always swing for one party leads voters to justify staying home on most election days, and leads candidates to appeal only to their base, instead of listening to diverse voices and representing their whole district. Boots countered that part of the problem is the lack of candidates willing to run for the other side. “Running for office is a challenge. It’s a challenge for people to put themselves out there,” Pam Dechert, former candidate in House District 88, told the IndySta...
Focusing on the negatives? Really?
Columnists, Tim Timmons

Focusing on the negatives? Really?

By Tim Timmons Tomorrow is the day we set aside to offer thanks. In a world where way too many of us focus on the negatives, perhaps we might keep a few things in mind? According to our government, 16,673 of our friends and neighbors have died from this pandemic. The population of Crawfordsville is 16,118. Toss in Waveland and Alamo for good measure and that’s about how many folks we’ve lost. (And please, for those who claim the figures are inflated could we agree that too many haven’t survived? Can we at least find common ground on that?) It’s been a long time – almost two years – of living with this new normal. At least there will be more family gatherings tomorrow than we had a year ago. That’s something to be thankful for, especially when maybe, if we’re lucky, the end of...
Olympic Gold Medal Winner Jim Dunbar
Butch Dale, Columnists

Olympic Gold Medal Winner Jim Dunbar

By Butch Dale How many people from Montgomery County have ever won an Olympic medal? Well, as far as I can tell...just two. One was basketball star Howie Williams, a 1945 New Ross graduate, who was a four year starter for Purdue and a member of the U.S. Olympic basketball team that won a gold medal at the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. (I will write a column about Howie later on.) The other medal winner was Jim Dunbar, a 1948 Darlington High School graduate, who won his gold medal at those same 1952 Olympics as a member of the U.S. men's eight-man rowing crew. So how did a farm boy from Darlington earn this great honor? James "Jim" Dunbar was an excellent student. He participated in sports, but although he was physically very strong, Jim was not considered an outstanding at...
Room at the table
Columnists, John Marlowe

Room at the table

By John Marlowe I’ve been contemplating Thanksgivings past, and I keep wondering where we put everyone. It wasn’t uncommon for us to go over the river and through the woods to various family houses for Christmas, but I only recall a few Thanksgivings that we didn’t spend at home. Our house just wasn’t that big. Nevertheless, aside from one Thanksgiving at my Uncle Stewty and Aunt Carol’s house in Traverse City, one with my maternal grandparents in Mobile and one in Chicago with my Aunt Sharon and Cousin Jim, I believe we played host to all the rest. My favorite Thanksgiving was the year I graduated from the “kids’ table” in the living room, to fill the empty slot at the grown-ups’ table. The move was made possible by the departure of my 101-year-old great-grandmother in Au...
November staff recommendations at the library
Columnists

November staff recommendations at the library

By Amanda Grossman It’s November (wait, what?) and we are already careening toward another holiday season and another new year. Maybe you want to take a deep breath, pause for a moment and enjoy the last of the beautiful fall scenery as it fades away before diving into the hustle and bustle of the next few months? Maybe you would like to bring some nature inside so you can enjoy it throughout the upcoming winter months? If so, our staff member Stephanie has the perfect recommendation for you to boost and multiply the scope and variety of your houseplant collection: Making More Plants: The Science, Art and Joy of Propagation by Kenneth Druse (635.91 Dru). No matter what the weather is like outside, you can keep growing and gardening your way into spring! Or perhaps you are done w...
What Thanksgiving looks like this year
Columnists

What Thanksgiving looks like this year

By Carrie Classon My mother sent a photo of a huge female turkey sitting on her bird feeder. The giant, ungainly creature looked ridiculous, perched on the little wooden roof of a feeder intended for chickadees and nuthatches. “She has been hanging around for two days now,” my mother wrote. “Maybe our Thanksgiving dinner?” Even before my mother sent this, I was thinking Thanksgiving looked a little strange this year. I’ve heard the complaints, year after year, about how we’re rushing the season, how we want to get through Halloween and Thanksgiving before we start thinking about Christmas. We don’t want turkeys dressed in Santa hats or a Christmas tree surrounded by pumpkins. Being something of a purist, I usually agreed. But this year, I say: Bring it on. Of cour...