League of Women Voters - The Paper of Montgomery County
An image.
Home | The Paper | Subscribe | Contact Us | Community Events
Saturday, March 23, 2019
  • Wednesday, March 20, 2019 4:00 AM
    Sunshine Week each March marks an annual nationwide discussion about access to public information and the important role that we – the public – have in keeping our communities healthy, vibrant and strong. The League of Women Voters joins other organizations in observing Sunshine Week and encouraging open government.
    The United States system of government is based on the premise that government is a creature of the people and is accountable to them. An open and accountable government is the cornerstone of a healthy, vibrant democracy. Since its founding, members of the League of Women Voters have been on the frontlines to promote governmental transparency at the local, state and national levels.
    The League believes it is incredibly important for citizens to know more about their government. Since 1947, members of the LWV of Montgomery County have served as observers at many of the government boards, councils, and commissions in Crawfordsville and Montgomery County.
    The LWV Observers listen and learn how these governmental boards functions and what issues they handle. The League seeks to assist its members and the public to become better educated about local issues. The Observers are the eyes and the ears of the League—a pipeline to what is being thought, said, and done in local government.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, March 14, 2019 4:00 AM
    The support of planned and articulate economic development in Montgomery County is a long-time objective of the League of Women Voters. When we think of the airport (and unfortunately, many of us may not even know it exists!), few of us look at it as a vital economic engine of our growth.
    In a recent presentation at the “Lunch with the League” program, Lori Curless, Manager of the Crawfordsville Regional Airport, showed us how she and her colleagues have transformed the facility into an important and financially stable enterprise that benefits virtually everyone in our area.
    Aside from being a pilot herself and coming from a family with a long tradition in aviation, Lori also knows a lot about branding and marketing. Even before she took over in 2017, plans were underway to change the name from the Crawfordsville Municipal Airport to Crawfordsville Regional Airport. A small change like this clarifies the demographic in a much more robust way when promoting the facility. When you visit (and all are welcome—especially the best kept secret—a picnic shelter with great views), you will also be greeted in an exceptional terminal and a staff wearing airport branded clothing. Airport staff even provide concierge services to assist pilots and passengers in lodging, car rental and dining. All this helps establish our airport as a truly professionally run organization eager to have return customers.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, March 7, 2019 4:00 AM
    The League of Women Voters has for forty years supported direct-popular-vote method for electing the President and Vice President and that the Electoral College should be abolished. The League supports the use of the National Popular Vote Compact as one acceptable way to achieve the goal of direct popular vote for election of the president, until the abolition of Electoral College is accomplished.
    The National Popular Vote Plan is an agreement among the states to guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in ALL 50 states & D.C.by reforming the Electoral College without the need for a constitutional amendment.
    This is a non-polarizing issue with support from both major parties. The National Popular Vote is aligned with the LWV mission to encourage participation and make every vote equal. The current system using the winner-take-all rule, awards all of the state’s electoral votes to the candidate who receives the most votes in the STATE instead of the candidate who receives the most votes in the Country. Winner take all rule was not the Founders choice and not in the Constitution. It was used by only 3 states in the first presidential election in 1789.
    1 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, March 6, 2019 4:00 AM
    The League of Women Voters has for forty years supported direct-popular-vote method for electing the President and Vice President and that the Electoral College should be abolished. The League supports the use of the National Popular Vote Compact as one acceptable way to achieve the goal of direct popular vote for election of the president, until the abolition of Electoral College is accomplished.
    The National Popular Vote Plan is an agreement among the states to guarantee the Presidency to the candidate who receives the most popular votes in ALL 50 states & D.C.by reforming the Electoral College without the need for a constitutional amendment.
    This is a non-polarizing issue with support from both major parties. The National Popular Vote is aligned with the LWV mission to encourage participation and make every vote equal. The current system using the winner-take-all rule, awards all of the state’s electoral votes to the candidate who receives the most votes in the STATE instead of the candidate who receives the most votes in the Country. Winner take all rule was not the Founders choice and not in the Constitution. It was used by only 3 states in the first presidential election in 1789.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, February 27, 2019 4:00 AM
    In 1987, the United States Congress designated March as National Women’s History Month. This creates a special opportunity in our schools, our workplaces, and our communities to recognize and celebrate the often-overlooked achievements of American women.
    The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.
    Each year there has been a theme designated by the National Women’s History Alliance which has become the hub for women’s history organizations and expanded its work as the clearinghouse for multicultural women’s history information.
    The special theme for 2019 is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace and Nonviolence.” This year women are being honored who have led efforts to end war, violence, and injustice and pioneered the use of nonviolence to change society. These Honorees embraced the fact that the means determine the ends and so developed nonviolent methods to ensure just and peaceful results.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, February 21, 2019 4:00 AM
    The League of Women Voters of Indiana held its Annual Presidents Day Celebration February 16 at the historic Propylaeum in Indianapolis. Local League Presidents and other local Board members from throughout Indiana joined State Board members to evaluate the last election and report on successful local activities as well as honor past State Presidents.
    Montgomery County’s Oscar Anderson, co-president of the LWVIN, convened the program “Evaluating Our Last Election: What we did and where can we go.” Updates were presented on national diversity, inclusion and equality (DEI) initiative and preliminary plans for 100th Anniversary of the LWV in 2020.
    Amy Smith, Greencastle LWV member and Associate Professor at Ivy Tech, shared valuable information on voter turnout by county and Indiana overall in recent elections with popular vote and percentages won by Democrat, Republican and Libertarian parties for US Indiana Senators and Representatives. Key information was distributed on the League’s emphasis on Making Democracy Work focusing on: Redistricting, Voting Rights and Voter Protection, Improving Elections and advocacy for the National Popular Vote Compact.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, February 13, 2019 4:00 AM
    February 14 marks the 99th anniversary of the founding of the League of Women Voters in 1920 by Carrie Chapman Catt, six months before the ratification of 19th amendment granting all women in the United States the right to vote.
    The 19th Amendment was the culmination of a 72 year effort which began in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. Visionary and courageous individuals throughout the country, including Zerelda Wallace, step-mother of Lew Wallace, were key suffrage supporters.
    From its beginning in 1920, the LWV has provided service to voters and influenced public policy through education and advocacy. The LWV does not endorse or oppose any candidate or political party and is now open to men as well as women. Since its inception, the League has helped millions of women and men become informed participants in government.
    Throughout the decades the League has successfully worked for many causes, including passage of the1921 Sheppard-Towner Act providing federal aid for maternal and child care programs and enactment of the Social Security and Food and Drug Acts (1930’s) establishment of the United Nations (1945), and public education. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, February 7, 2019 4:00 AM
    “Economic Development Primer” was presented by Cheryl Morphew, Economic Development Consultant for the City of Crawfordsville and Montgomery County, at February 4 Lunch with the League. Morphew noted “not one-size fits all” definitions of Economic Development and suggested three:
    • Creation of jobs and wealth to improve the economic well-being of a community,
    • Programs and policies directed at improving the local community, and
    • Economic development as facilitation of long-term investment that leads to community prosperity.
    There are base industries vs service industries. Base industries are those that produce, export, and sell their goods outside of a community, thus bringing in new dollars which in turn increases the total dollars that circulate within a community. Pace Dairy Food, LSC Communications and Nucor would be examples. Service industries are those business that sell goods which circulate existing dollars in the community. This includes nearly all local retail and dining.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, January 31, 2019 4:00 AM
    This is the third column reporting on the League of Women Voters of Montgomery County Homeschool study co-chaired by Alice Phillips and Kathy Steele and deals with number of children homeschooled and the committee’s takeaway after the first year of study.
    Students Who Leave Public Schools: Tracking data from South Montgomery, North Montgomery and Crawfordsville from the 2016-17 and 2017-18 school years provided the committee the number of students who left formal public education. During 2016-17, 102 students from grades K-12 exited public education to be homeschooled or to attend virtual school at home. During the 2017-18 school year, 80 students exited public education. Sixty-five percent withdrew to homeschool while 35 percent withdrew to attend virtual schools or online academies. The committee only knows the number of students who have left local school districts. Homeschool educators do not need to report to the state or to the local school districts. Therefore, the number of students in our community who are homeschooled is much higher.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, January 24, 2019 4:00 AM
    Homeschool Resources—this is the second column reporting on the League of Women Voters of Montgomery County Homeschool study co-chaired by Alice Phillips and Kathy Steele and deals with Homeschool Resources.
    Parents who choose to homeschool have several important resources. The Indiana Association of Homeschool Educators (IAHE) has a yearly convention where homeschool educators can find curriculum materials, books, testing materials and helpful guidelines. The Crawfordsville Area Christian Home Educators (CACHE) is a local group of parents who homeschool. They plan field trips, have pitch-in dinners, trade curriculum books and materials and conduct monthly meetings. These parents provide an important base of support for each other. 
    One homeschool educator on the committee discussed the time, effort, dedication and expense that it takes to homeschool children. She mentioned that in her 20 years of homeschooling, she knew of only a few parents who did not take this responsibility seriously. Her children were academically prepared to enter college or to be successful in a skilled trades program. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, January 17, 2019 4:00 AM
    The League of Women Voters position on energy is simple and straightforward: “Support environmentally sound policies that reduce energy growth rates, emphasize energy conservation and encourage the use of renewable resources.” We learned in a recent presentation at the Lunch With the League program that this position can be realized. Jack Alvey, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the Indiana municipal Power Agency (IMPA), showed how our ever changing electric supply mix is giving us low-cost, reliable and environmentally responsible power to both residential and commercial/industrial clients.
    Crawfordsville Electric Light & Power (CEL&P) is one of the 61 Indiana and Ohio municipalities that make up IMPA. Created in 1980, IMPA uses economies of scale to acquire, construct and finance a reliable supply of low-cost power. We are very fortunate that CEL&P’s manager, Phil Goode, also serves as Chairman of IMPA.
    For decades, coal and nuclear produced the majority of electricity in the United States. Throughout the 50s and 60s, plants of both types were relatively inexpensive to construct. There was a perceived unlimited supply of fuel available. Soon things would change. Smog (a mixture of smoke and fog) became a major problem in urban areas such as Los Angeles. Then in 1979, the accidental release of radiation at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Pennsylvania led to very strict new regulations for the use and construction of those types of plants. Renewable energy was not then a viable part of the mix. It was just too expensive and the technology was not advanced.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, January 10, 2019 4:00 AM
    During 2017-18, members of the League of Women Voters Homeschool Committee co-chaired by Alice Phillips and Kathy Steele studied homeschooling in Montgomery County. Information was gathered from online sources, phone conversations, school data, experiences from committee members and personal interviews with school personnel, two parents who homeschool, a current homeschool educator, an online academy teacher and Audra Hacker, Homeschool Support Specialist from the Indiana Department of Education. This is the first of three columns reporting on the LWV Homeschool study.
    State Regulations:
    Legally homeschools are considered non-public, non-accredited schools and are on the same legal level as private schools. Parents who homeschool must educate their children for 180 days and keep a record of attendance. The attendance record may be requested by the State Superintendent or the superintendent of the local school corporation. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, January 3, 2019 4:00 AM
    Members of the 2019 Indiana General Assembly gathered on Organization Day Tuesday, November 20, and the 121st Official General Assembly reconvened Thursday, January 3. The 2019 session is a budget year in which state lawmakers must craft a comprehensive plan to fund Indiana governmental services for the next two years. By law, the 2019 legislative session must be completed by April 29.
    Many important issues will be addressed. The League of Women Voters of Indiana has prioritized bills of interest in five areas—Redistricting, Voting Rights, Environment and Natural Resources, and Education. Some of the bills in these areas have been introduced.
    The LWV promotes transparent and accountable redistricting processes and an end to hyper-partisan practices. The LWV encourages creation of an independent special commission that reflects the diversity of the unit of government.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, December 27, 2018 4:00 AM
    At this time of year when many of us make resolutions, the League of Women Voters encourages all to include citizen engagement in your goals for 2019.
    The American governmental system, conceived by our founding fathers more than 200 years ago, has provided the framework for the most responsive government in the world; but it only works if citizens are informed and involved.
    Be knowledgeable about the issues. Montgomery County citizens are invited to attend the “State of City/County” public meeting which will be held Tuesday, January 22, at 7 p.m. in the Crawfordsville High School Auditorium. Sponsored by the League of Women Voters, the meeting will feature Mayor Todd Barton and County Commissioner Jim Fulwider who will present issues and actions of our city and county. Refreshments will be served.
    Voting is the most fundamental right and responsibility of American citizens. Very important elections will be held in 2019 for city, county, state, and national offices. To be eligible to vote, you must be registered. If you are not presently registered, you can register in person at the Voter Registration Office at the Court House or at the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. The Primary Election will be held Tuesday, May 7 and voters should be registered by April 8.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, December 20, 2018 4:00 AM
    The 227th anniversary of the signing of the “Bill of Rights” was celebrated last Saturday. Ratified on December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights guarantees fundamental civil and human rights of all citizens, residents, and visitors on United States territory.
    The first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution include the freedoms of speech, press and religion, the people’s right to keep and bear arms, the freedom of assembly, the freedom to petition, the right to be free of unreasonable search and seizure and compelled self-incrimination.
    Further, the Bill of Rights guarantees due process, trial by jury, prohibition of excessive bail as well as cruel and unusual punishment. Powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.
    The League of Women Voters calls for continued protection of civil liberties, improved political discourse and greater civic participation. Since our founding in 1920, the League has worked to defend civil liberties and promote citizen engagement in democracy, and we continue this emphasis today. The League’s mission seeks to help individuals recognize the critical importance of protecting and honoring our most cherished constitutional rights and how they impact our everyday lives.
    0 comment(s)
Looking for something older? Try our archive search
Copyright 2019
The Paper of Montgomery County,
a division of Sagamore News Media 
201 E. Jefferson Street
P.O. Box 272
Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933

 

Main:
Classifieds:
Fax:
(765) 361-0100
(765) 361-8888
(765) 361-5901
Advertising:
Editorial:
(765) 361-0100 Ext. 18
(765) 361-8888


Software © 1998-2019 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved
GO




Our app is now available!