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Tuesday, October 16, 2018
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  • Thursday, October 4, 2018 10:11 PM
    Walking is one of the best types of physical activities because it is accessible to almost anyone, doesn’t require specific skills or equipment, is inexpensive, can be done in a variety of settings (in your neighborhood, at the mall, around a track), and can be performed at any chosen intensity. As the weather starts to cool off, don’t let that scare you from getting outside. Just add an extra layer and enjoy the beautiful fall colors. The sugar creek trail provides a beautiful setting for fall walking. 
    How much walking and physical activity do I need?
    The current U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines recommend that adults get at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) each week of moderate intensity physical activity, such as brisk walking. This activity should be accumulated 10 minutes or more at a time. 
    How to get started
    • Start slow and easy, walk 10 minutes to start.
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  • Tuesday, October 2, 2018 10:01 PM
    Fall is here, which also means that there are lots of fun activities for families to take part in. One event that I hope you and your family will consider is our 3rd annual Spooky Science event on Saturday, October 20th from 6:00-7:00 pm at the Montgomery County 4-H Fairgrounds. 
    This FREE event is open to all ages and we encourage families to bring their youth in Halloween costumes and trick-or-treat at all of our fun Spooky Science stations. There will also be livestock animals there for families to learn about. We will be serving a FREE chili dinner and have hayrides starting at 6:45 pm. Youth do not have to be in 4-H to attend. We welcome all families and community members of Montgomery County to come out for a fun and relaxing evening together. 
    New for this year, we will have other organizations be a part of the fun. We are excited to welcome the Carnegie Museum, Crawfordsville District Public Library, Rotary Jail, and Youth Services Bureau to our community-wide event. They too will have a Spooky Science station and information about how they serve community members of Montgomery County.
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  • Thursday, September 20, 2018 9:47 PM
    Are you ready to get moving, improve your health and enjoy life more? Get WalkIN’ is a free e-mail based walking program being offered through Purdue Extension Montgomery County. Participants can sign-up, walk on their own and receive e-mailed support and information. Get WalkIN’ support will take place October 2nd through December 18th. It is designed to encourage individuals to learn more about the health benefits of walking and encourage individuals to get moving.
    Walking is a popular form of physical activity—and good for your health! Only half of all American adults get the recommended amount of physical activity. Lack of physical activity is directly related to the occurrence of adult obesity and overweight. Regular physical activity can lower risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, depression, and falls in older adults. Walking is an excellent way for most people to increase their physical activity. It is an easy way to start and maintain a physically active lifestyle. 
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  • Friday, September 14, 2018 4:00 AM
    Is it healthy? That’s a question many of us ask ourselves when selecting what to eat. Some of us analyze everything we put into our mouth, basing it on the statements on the food packaging and claims we hear in the news or find on the internet. Food producers and marketers also throw “healthy food” around to try to get you to buy their products. This can make the simple act of eating, a necessity to live, frankly quite stressful. 
    So what is a healthy food? Healthy used as an adjective to describe the food we eat, describes food that is beneficial to our health and would contribute to improving or maintaining a person’s overall health. While the word unhealthy used to describe food means the opposite, food that is harmful or may promote a poor state of health. So, in simple terms, healthy food is good for our health and unhealthy food is bad for our health. But still, what defines a healthy food? 
    If we look at pizza, for example, it’s often considered an unhealthy food. Pizza in its most basic form is bread with some tomato sauce topped with cheese, none of which are detrimental towards our health. Yes, eating too much fat can be problematic, so let’s assume pizza is only eaten occasionally and in moderation. Then why is pizza considered unhealthy? 
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  • Extension Office: Think Spring? Sure, with Fall Bulbs!
    Wednesday, August 29, 2018 4:00 AM
    It might not feel like it with high heat and humidity in our last few dog days of summer, but fall is just around the corner (thank goodness!). In just a few short weeks we will begin seeing corn and soybean harvest, cool overnight low temperatures, leaves hinting at autumn hues, and a crisp breeze or two as we head toward October. 
    Now is the perfect time to consider planting choices for flowering bulbs. I never turn down an excuse to look at a seed catalog, and it can be especially fun to browse through the bright and beautiful blooms afforded by a bulb book. Making decisions on which bulbs to order is often difficult and overwhelming with so many options available, especially if you’re a beginner. Here, we look into a few considerations to make to help you make good choices and have a successful spring bloom.
    • Hardiness – Bulbs are categorized by their hardiness. Hardy bulbs are those that can overwinter underground and actually require those cold winter months for proper growth and development. Tender bulbs are those that must be dug up before soil temperatures reach freezing. A good rule of thumb is to dig up tender bulbs after light frost (you’ll notice that foliage starts to turn yellow and die off). Tender bulbs should be cleaned, left to dry, and then stored in a cool (50°F), dry, dark place until the last hard frost of spring. Some examples of tender bulbs include gladiolus, dahlias, and tuberous begonias.
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  • Wednesday, August 22, 2018 4:00 AM
    It is my favorite time of year, the fields are turning brown, but my tomatoes are turning red. Each and every year, I am faced with the same problem. I can’t eat all the tomatoes my garden produces. Tomato juice is always good to have around in the winter for making chili or other soups. I can always take the easy route, and throw it in the freezer, but my freezer is already full. When canning tomatoes it is important to follow a USDA approved recipe. Methods of canning depend on the acidity level of the food, and tomatoes are borderline to the 4.6 pH level. When selecting tomatoes, be sure to use disease-free, vine-ripened tomatoes. Do not can tomatoes from dead or frost-killed vines. 
    Tomatoes are able to be boiling-water-bath-canned under the condition that they are acidified. To ensure acidity in whole, crushed, or juiced tomatoes, add 2 tablespoons of bottled lemon juice or ½ teaspoon of citric acid per quart of tomatoes. For pints, use half the quantity. 
    Most tomato products can be boiling-water-bath-canned with the exception of Seasoned Spaghetti Sauce, with or without meat and barbecue sauce. Again, using a USDA approved recipe is pertinent when canning tomatoes products to maintain an appropriate pH. 
    When canning tomatoes, the most important thing to remember is to never increase proportions or add vegetables that aren’t included in the recipe. These ingredients can always be added when serving. 
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  • Tuesday, August 21, 2018 4:00 AM
    The 2017-2018 4-H year is coming to a close and what a year it has been! This year, Montgomery County 4-H had 739 youth in grades K-12 enrolled in 4-H. We also enrolled 124 NEW 4-H youth this past year! We had 68 youth that took part in 4-H trips on the local and state levels. New programs for this year included a Makerspace Club at Hoover Elementary, a 4-H Robotics Club, and an afterschool 4-H Club at Pleasant Hill Elementary. Our youth were active in the community, taking part in various community service projects and taking on leadership roles in their local 4-H Clubs. Furthermore, at the great Indiana State Fair, we had many youth that had the tremendous opportunity to exhibit in the 2018 Grand Drive. To see the project exhibit results of how our 4-H members did at the Indiana State Fair, please visit the following link: https://extension.purdue.edu/4h/Pages/results.aspx. 
    Looking ahead to the 2018-2019 4-H year, I am excited to see what the next year will hold for Montgomery County 4-H. Want to be a part of this amazing youth-serving organization? Enrollment for 4-H will begin on October 1st and will conclude on January 15th. There are opportunities for youth to attend specialized 4-H trips on the local, state, and national levels, and earn awards and scholarships along the way. Youth will gain the life skills that will help them be successful now and in their future endeavors. 
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  • Saturday, August 4, 2018 4:00 AM
    This spring we planted our gardens with immense anticipation of the bountiful harvest we would have this summer. Now that we are faced with the limitless harvest of summer squash, we are begging our families, friends and enemies to take the produce as far away as possible. 
    Summer squash is very easy to grow and has a reputation for overwhelming production. Yellow squash and zucchini can yield anywhere between three to 25 pounds of squash per growing season. And will continue to produce all summer long until disease or frost kills the plant. So if you are like me and thought you needed the four pack of zucchini this spring, next year maybe adjust how many plants you purchase to one. Or do as I do, and wait for the people mentioned above, to beg me to take it away. 
    I digress, so what can I do with all this squash? There are many culinary uses for this nutrition packed vegetable. Whether you have crookneck, pattypan, yellow or zucchini be sure to select squash that are heavy for their size, glossy and small to medium size. Squash is paired well with pasta, onion, tomato, grilled pork, beef, chicken, rosemary and garlic. You could also incorporate zucchini into breads or cakes to add moisture and Vitamin A and C. Summer squash is used in many cultures, such as Vietnamese, Bulgaria, Egypt, France, Mexico and Russia. It is eaten raw, fried and stuffed, or my favorite way, served with tzatziki (a cucumber, yogurt and dill dip).
    Squash is also very healthy food to eat. It is low in energy with about 19 calories per cup. It has beneficial amounts of folate, potassium and Vitamin A. Potassium is important for blood pressure, and folate helps treat anemia and is crucial for pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects. Folate is not made by the body requiring it to be consumed from our diet. Zucchini is also making a strong appearance on the culinary scene as a low carb alternative to noodles, “zoodles”. 
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  • Monday, July 23, 2018 4:00 AM
    The Montgomery County Master Gardener Basic Training program is slated to begin in less than 3 weeks. We are looking forward to hosting a great class for those of you already planning to attend! There is still time left to sign up for this course if you want to sharpen your skills as a gardener.
    There’s a little something for everyone in the Master Garden Basic Training course. Our topics are scheduled as follows:
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  • Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:00 AM
    It is that time of year again when the garden is putting out plenty of produce. We want to make sure we can eat that produce year-round. So, we dust off the canners and pull them out for a summer full of food preservation. But I have to stop and ask myself, “What methods are safe for which foods?” 
    If you’re looking to “can” produce from your garden, there are only two safe methods: boiling water bath canning and pressure canning. Boiling water bath canning is safe to use when canning high–acid foods, which are the majority of your fruits and pickled foods. Pressure canning is required when canning low-acid foods, which includes most vegetables and meats. 
    Low acid home canned foods are associated with Clostridium Botulinum. It has an 8% fatality rate and patients require hospitalization. Botulism toxin is a neurotoxin; it attacks nerve cells and paralyzes them. Symptoms appear 4 to 8 hours after eating contaminated food and begin at the head and work slowly downward. The danger of Clostridium Botulinum is the number one risk to our home canned foods, and why we must ensure proper canning techniques are being used. 
    One of the biggest mistakes people make when canning foods, is placing hot food in a jar and letting it cool. The jar appears to have sealed but it does not have a vacuum seal that has removed all the oxygen from the jar. In order to create a vacuum seal you must submerge jars in a boiling water bath or pressure canner. Canned foods should also only be made using USDA approved recipes. These include recipes in the Ball Blue Book and all should be from 1994 or more recent. 
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  • Wednesday, June 20, 2018 4:00 AM
    It’s that time of year again . . . fair season! Montgomery County Homemakers are hosting open class. Don’t know what the open class is? Well, the open class is an opportunity during the Montgomery County fair for everyone to bring in a project or projects and have them judged. Open class is a great opportunity to show the community of Montgomery County what your passions or hobbies are. Maybe you try something new in open class and find out that you are naturally talented in that area. A champion will be chosen from each of the 18 classes, and all ages are welcome to participate, even those already participating in 4H. There is something for everyone, some of the classes include: culinary arts, flower arrangements, fine arts, garden art, sewing, photography, etc. 
    To participate pick up a registration form at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office. There is a small registration fee of $3 for each project for the early bird registration (July 6th) and $4 for each project for regular registration. You will be required to pay for the first five projects, but any after that can be submitted for free. The registration can be paid for at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office, which is located at the fairgrounds. 
    Project check-in for open class will begin on July 12 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and then again on July 14 from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. With project check-out on July 19 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    If you have any questions please feel free to call the extension office at (765) 364-6363. 
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  • Friday, June 15, 2018 4:00 AM
    School is out and summer is here! While 4-H is a year-round program, summer brings a flurry of 4-H programs and activities. There are many opportunities that happen on the local and state level for youth to get involved in. These are just a few of the summer opportunities that youth can take part in.
    4-H Camp is an opportunity for youth that just completed grades 3-6 in which they spend 3 days at Shakamak State Park with 3 other counties. Youth learn skills related to Science, Natural Resources, cooking, and more. This is a great opportunity for youth to make new friends, learn new skills, and have fun! 
    On the State level, 4-H Round Up occurs at Purdue University for youth that just completed grades 7-9. This is a career exploration opportunity in which youth select various topic areas that interest them and then are able to learn from Purdue faculty and staff. Youth also are able to make lifelong friends from across the state of Indiana. 4-H Academy @ Purdue is for youth that just completed grades 9-12 and is specifically designed to offer youth hands-on, exciting opportunities to learn about a diverse selection of subjects and careers. Youth get the opportunity to stay on Purdue’s campus and learn from professors, graduate students and other experts in their respective fields and participate in interactive activities and experiential learning. 
    Close to home, the Purdue Extension-Montgomery County office team is currently teaching Garden to Grill for youth that just completed grades 3-6. Youth are learning about Food Science, the daily care and management of taking care of a garden, STEM, and how to prepare fruits and vegetables on the grill. An educational garden located at the fairgrounds, allows youth to gain hands-on experience working in a garden and then are able to prepare those vegetables and other fruits on the grill. 
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  • Wednesday, June 13, 2018 4:00 AM
    Are you interested in honing your skills as a gardener? Do you have years of experience in your lawn and garden and want to teach others about your experience? Or are you just starting out, and want to learn all the best information for doing things right? Do you enjoy working outside and volunteering with other local organizations? The Purdue Master Gardener program could be right for you!
    Becoming a Purdue Master Gardener volunteer is a two-part process: first, you must sign up for the Purdue Master Gardener Basic Training course. Second, you must pass an exam at the end of the course. The 35+ hour training course introduces and explores many topics, ranging from weed management in the home lawn to diagnosing plant diseases in your garden. Montgomery County’s Basic Training course will cover these topics and more beginning August 8th. The class meets every Wednesday from 9AM-12PM from August 8th until October 31st at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall. The class will begin with a pre-test so that we can learn a little bit about what you already know. The class ends with a post-test that you must pass with a score of 70% or better in order to become a Master Gardener volunteer. 
    Master Gardener volunteers maintain their status as volunteers by completing community service projects and attending lawn and garden education programs. There are lots of opportunities to maintain volunteer status. It is easy to learn and grow your knowledge with other volunteers in our community and around the state!
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  • Friday, June 1, 2018 4:00 AM
    2018 Open Class
    It’s that time of year again . . . fair season! Montgomery County Homemakers are hosting open class. Don’t know what the open class is? Well, the open class is an opportunity during the Montgomery County fair for everyone to bring in a project or projects and have them judged. Open class is a great opportunity to show the community of Montgomery County what your passions or hobbies are. Maybe you try something new in open class and find out that you are naturally talented in that area. A champion will be chosen from each of the 18 classes, and all ages are welcome to participate, even those already participating in 4H. There is something for everyone, some of the classes include: culinary arts, flower arrangements, fine arts, garden art, sewing, photography, etc.
    To participate pick up a registration form at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office. There is a small registration fee of $3 for each project for the Early bird registration (July 6) and $4 for each project for regular registration. You will be required to pay for the first 5 projects, but any after that can be submitted for free. The registration can be paid for at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office, which is located at the fairgrounds. 
    Project check-in for open class will begin on Thursday, July 12 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and then again on Saturday, July 14 from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. With project check-out on Thursday, July 19 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    If you have any questions please feel free to call the extension office at (765) 364-6363. 
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  • Wednesday, May 2, 2018 4:00 AM

    Beans, beans the musical fruit, the more you eat, the more you . . . well . . . you get the point. In the end the better you feel. Beans are unique because they aren’t just nutrient powerhouses but they belong to two separate foods groups known as the protein and vegetable groups. Like other vegetables, beans are packed with fiber, folate, and potassium. They are similar to other protein-rich foods in that they are packed with, well, the obvious protein and iron. There is also little to no sodium and cholesterol in beans. 
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The Paper of Montgomery County,
a division of Sagamore News Media 
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