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Thursday, June 21, 2018
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  • purdue extension montgomery county

  • Wednesday, June 20, 2018 4:00 AM
    It’s that time of year again . . . fair season! Montgomery County Homemakers are hosting open class. Don’t know what the open class is? Well, the open class is an opportunity during the Montgomery County fair for everyone to bring in a project or projects and have them judged. Open class is a great opportunity to show the community of Montgomery County what your passions or hobbies are. Maybe you try something new in open class and find out that you are naturally talented in that area. A champion will be chosen from each of the 18 classes, and all ages are welcome to participate, even those already participating in 4H. There is something for everyone, some of the classes include: culinary arts, flower arrangements, fine arts, garden art, sewing, photography, etc. 
    To participate pick up a registration form at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office. There is a small registration fee of $3 for each project for the early bird registration (July 6th) and $4 for each project for regular registration. You will be required to pay for the first five projects, but any after that can be submitted for free. The registration can be paid for at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office, which is located at the fairgrounds. 
    Project check-in for open class will begin on July 12 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and then again on July 14 from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. With project check-out on July 19 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    If you have any questions please feel free to call the extension office at (765) 364-6363. 
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  • Friday, June 15, 2018 4:00 AM
    School is out and summer is here! While 4-H is a year-round program, summer brings a flurry of 4-H programs and activities. There are many opportunities that happen on the local and state level for youth to get involved in. These are just a few of the summer opportunities that youth can take part in.
    4-H Camp is an opportunity for youth that just completed grades 3-6 in which they spend 3 days at Shakamak State Park with 3 other counties. Youth learn skills related to Science, Natural Resources, cooking, and more. This is a great opportunity for youth to make new friends, learn new skills, and have fun! 
    On the State level, 4-H Round Up occurs at Purdue University for youth that just completed grades 7-9. This is a career exploration opportunity in which youth select various topic areas that interest them and then are able to learn from Purdue faculty and staff. Youth also are able to make lifelong friends from across the state of Indiana. 4-H Academy @ Purdue is for youth that just completed grades 9-12 and is specifically designed to offer youth hands-on, exciting opportunities to learn about a diverse selection of subjects and careers. Youth get the opportunity to stay on Purdue’s campus and learn from professors, graduate students and other experts in their respective fields and participate in interactive activities and experiential learning. 
    Close to home, the Purdue Extension-Montgomery County office team is currently teaching Garden to Grill for youth that just completed grades 3-6. Youth are learning about Food Science, the daily care and management of taking care of a garden, STEM, and how to prepare fruits and vegetables on the grill. An educational garden located at the fairgrounds, allows youth to gain hands-on experience working in a garden and then are able to prepare those vegetables and other fruits on the grill. 
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  • Wednesday, June 13, 2018 4:00 AM
    Are you interested in honing your skills as a gardener? Do you have years of experience in your lawn and garden and want to teach others about your experience? Or are you just starting out, and want to learn all the best information for doing things right? Do you enjoy working outside and volunteering with other local organizations? The Purdue Master Gardener program could be right for you!
    Becoming a Purdue Master Gardener volunteer is a two-part process: first, you must sign up for the Purdue Master Gardener Basic Training course. Second, you must pass an exam at the end of the course. The 35+ hour training course introduces and explores many topics, ranging from weed management in the home lawn to diagnosing plant diseases in your garden. Montgomery County’s Basic Training course will cover these topics and more beginning August 8th. The class meets every Wednesday from 9AM-12PM from August 8th until October 31st at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall. The class will begin with a pre-test so that we can learn a little bit about what you already know. The class ends with a post-test that you must pass with a score of 70% or better in order to become a Master Gardener volunteer. 
    Master Gardener volunteers maintain their status as volunteers by completing community service projects and attending lawn and garden education programs. There are lots of opportunities to maintain volunteer status. It is easy to learn and grow your knowledge with other volunteers in our community and around the state!
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  • Friday, June 1, 2018 4:00 AM
    2018 Open Class
    It’s that time of year again . . . fair season! Montgomery County Homemakers are hosting open class. Don’t know what the open class is? Well, the open class is an opportunity during the Montgomery County fair for everyone to bring in a project or projects and have them judged. Open class is a great opportunity to show the community of Montgomery County what your passions or hobbies are. Maybe you try something new in open class and find out that you are naturally talented in that area. A champion will be chosen from each of the 18 classes, and all ages are welcome to participate, even those already participating in 4H. There is something for everyone, some of the classes include: culinary arts, flower arrangements, fine arts, garden art, sewing, photography, etc.
    To participate pick up a registration form at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office. There is a small registration fee of $3 for each project for the Early bird registration (July 6) and $4 for each project for regular registration. You will be required to pay for the first 5 projects, but any after that can be submitted for free. The registration can be paid for at the Montgomery County Purdue Extension office, which is located at the fairgrounds. 
    Project check-in for open class will begin on Thursday, July 12 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and then again on Saturday, July 14 from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. With project check-out on Thursday, July 19 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    If you have any questions please feel free to call the extension office at (765) 364-6363. 
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  • Wednesday, May 2, 2018 4:00 AM

    Beans, beans the musical fruit, the more you eat, the more you . . . well . . . you get the point. In the end the better you feel. Beans are unique because they aren’t just nutrient powerhouses but they belong to two separate foods groups known as the protein and vegetable groups. Like other vegetables, beans are packed with fiber, folate, and potassium. They are similar to other protein-rich foods in that they are packed with, well, the obvious protein and iron. There is also little to no sodium and cholesterol in beans. 
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  • Wednesday, April 18, 2018 4:00 AM
    What do you think of when you hear the term “local food?” It can mean visiting your weekly farmers market or canning tomatoes out of your own garden. It can also mean participating in a community supported agriculture program, picking apples at a local orchard, or purchasing meat processed by a local butcher. Local food can be found using many different avenues, but it all comes back to the same concept – sourcing food from farms and businesses that are operating in the community where you live.
    Local food has benefits that aren’t limited to the shorter distance food travels to get to your dinner plate. Here are a few:

    • Sourcing food from local farmers is an excellent way to build relationships in the community
    • Getting to know your farmer gives you the chance to learn how your food is grown and processed, which can sometimes be difficult to figure out at the supermarket
    • Produce purchased from local farmers is also often picked when fully ripe and is fresher, versus supermarket produce that is typically harvested underripe, with storage and transportation needs in mind
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  • Thursday, April 5, 2018 4:00 AM
    As March headed to the history books, so do my National Nutrition Month articles. I recently attended a presentation where the infographic included was used. This graphic has helped me to reflect on what I’ve written and to look forward with where we need to go from there. A couple of weeks ago, I wrote an article about eating more plants; as you can see, only one in ten adults eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables! Reminder, the recommendation is 2 cups of fruit and 3 cups of vegetables per day. 
    What else are we lacking in? Well, physical activity. Less than half of all adults meet their physical activity guidelines. Now, I get it – we have jobs that require us to sit most of the day, and sometimes the last thing you want to do is go to the gym. The Physical Activity Guidelines recommend 150 minutes a week, or 30 minutes five days a week. Yes, we sit a lot, but 30 minutes is totally doable! A lot of us wear Fitbits these days, and if you are like the girls in my office, 10 minutes to the hour their Fitbits yell at them to get up and move those 250 steps! So when the weather is bad, they truck it around the office, but when it warms up we’re able to get outside. This not only helps us to get our steps in and meet our physical activity requirements, but we’re able to focus more and increase our productivity at work.
    In order to be physically active, you have to do what you enjoy. Walking is one of my personal favorites because it’s easy and accessible to nearly everyone – walking doesn’t require special equipment, it’s inexpensive, and can be done anywhere and at your own pace! Dancing more your style? Find a partner and get grooving! No matter what you choose, be sure to start slow and easy. Moving for a minimum of 10 minutes has been shown to improve your overall physical fitness. Pay attention to your posture and form and don’t forget to breathe and hydrate! No one will ever exercise if their feet hurt, so throw a pair of tennis shoes in the car so that you have them on hand when you feel the urge to move. Set a goal and find a way to track your progress. I mentioned Fitbit, but there are plenty of other apps out there.
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  • Wednesday, April 4, 2018 4:00 AM
    After a recent article, readers expressed interest in learning more about Protein. Protein is one of those super-important nutrients that we can get from both animal and plant sources. Unlike other nutrients, protein needs don’t vary as much as many believe; whether you’re trying to bulk up the muscle, or you just want to maintain and boost your metabolism, your body can still only absorb so much protein.
    So how much is just enough? According to the Institute of Medicine, you should be consuming between 10 percent and 35 percent of your calories through protein. Of course, based on a 2,000 calorie diet, this is approximately 50-175 grams. For those of you who eat less than 2,000 calories in a day, let’s do the math: You should aim for about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight.
    When should I consume protein for best results? Research has shown that Americans eat 42 percent of their daily protein at dinner, and only 16 percent at breakfast. Recent studies have confirmed that peak muscle synthesis occurs at about 25 grams. This demonstrates that we should be eating approximately 20 grams of protein, per meal, evenly throughout the day. Want to promote healthy aging, and help reduce age-related muscle loss? Strive for 30 grams. To help visualize, a 3-ounce chicken breast is about 25 grams, and 1 egg is 6 gram. Peak muscle synthesis research demonstrates that more protein doesn’t necessarily equal more muscle mass. One research study proved a 50% increase in muscle synthesis with both 4-ounces of beef, and 12-ounces of beef. My recommendation for incorporating protein should be around 20-30 grams per meal. Make sure to keep it consistent throughout the day, or you could be wasting valuable protein.
    Where should I get my protein? Acceptable protein sources can come from both plants and animals. Animal protein provides you with a calorie-to-protein bargain. A 3-ounce serving of salmon has 133 calories and 23 grams of protein, while ½ cup of beans gives you 108 calories and 8 grams of protein. While a three ounce serving of meat is the size of a deck of cards, many of us don’t stop there! Another advantage to animal proteins is that they are complete proteins, meaning they have all 9 essential amino acids. These amino acids are ‘essential’ because our body can’t produce them naturally, so they must come from our diet. This is why plant-based proteins are often paired, such as beans and rice. As long as you are consuming a variety of incomplete proteins, you’ll be able to fulfill your quota for essential amino acids.
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  • Wednesday, March 28, 2018 4:00 AM
    Within the 4-H program, there are a vast amount of opportunities for youth to travel both near and far to experience hands-on, fun, educational opportunities that opens the door to endless career possibilities and options. These are also great ways to make the most of the 4-H experience and meet new friends that could last a lifetime. 
    One trip that is just for youth currently in grades 7-9 is called 4-H Round-Up. 4-H Round-Up occurs June 25-27 and takes place at Purdue University. Participants of 4-H Round-Up have the opportunity to explore a variety of careers by attending classes created just for participants. Youth will get a taste of college life and will live in a Purdue Residence Hall for two night. Furthermore, youth have an opportunity to meet others from across the state and further develop their leadership skills.
    Another great trip opportunity is called 4-H Academy @ Purdue, which is held June 13-15. 4-H Academy @ Purdue is for youth currently in grades 9-12 and is specifically designed to offer students hands-on, exciting opportunities to learn about a diverse selection of subjects and careers. During this conference, participants will meet and learn from professors, graduate students and other experts in their respective fields and participate in interactive activities. Participants will stay in a Purdue University Residence Hall and will be able to explore the Purdue University campus and meet 4-H members from across the state. Youth can choose from the list below to learn about the science of and careers related to animals, flight, personal finance, health, computers, citizenship, entrepreneurship, journalism, natural resources, plants, engineering, food, and robotics! 
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  • Thursday, March 22, 2018 4:00 AM
    Last week, we discussed facts about Fats for National Nutrition Month. Now, let’s get down and dirty with Carbs. I know, carbs is *supposed* to be a bad word, but they’re an important part of your diet. With fad diets being thrown around, such as Keto or Low-Carb dieting, let me stop you right now: Restricting carbs to 20 grams per day isn’t the way to go.
    The Ketogenic diet was originally designed in the 1920’s for people suffering from epileptic seizures, and even today, is only clinically supported for this purpose. Keto is a diet high in fat, adequate protein, and low in carbohydrates. This diet is literally everywhere. 
    “So, if Keto is all the rage, why are you telling me not to cut carbs?”
    Great question. When I say ‘don’t cut carbs,’ I mean don’t cut the healthy fiber out that contains carbs, such as whole grains, sweet potatoes, or fruit. These are our body’s power sources! Cutting sugar-carbs, such as cookies, cakes, and white bread are fine. Just like your car needs gasoline to run, your body needs carbs to help you jog, breathe, think, and even digest the food you are eating. Glucose is the only energy source your brain can use.
    “So how many carbs can I eat?”
    The right amount of carb intake is based on how much glucose you need for your brain to function normally. Let’s break it down: for anyone over the age of one, it would be 130 grams of carbohydrates.
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  • Wednesday, March 7, 2018 4:00 AM
    March may be known for St. Patty’s day, but it’s also National Nutrition Month! This year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is encouraging us to “Go Further with Food.” In my mind, this doesn’t mean restricting ourselves from eating the foods we love, but for some reason, fats tend to be the number one nutrient on the chopping block. So my March challenge for you is to “Go Further with Fat!”
    Fats have such a bad reputation these days, but Dietary Fats have several important roles in your health! Your brain is made up of approximately 60 percent fat, and fats play an active role in every cell in our body. They’re an important part of our hormones that regulate smooth muscle contraction, immune function, and blood clotting. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are all fat-soluble vitamins, meaning they require fat to be absorbed (dissolved), and utilized in our bodies. Fat is a satiety nutrient as well. Not only does it add great flavor, but it signals to our brain that we are full and should stop eating. 
    We often fall into the misconception that fat is bad for our heart health, but there are ‘good’ fats, such as mono and poly unsaturated fats. Unsaturated fats help reduce your bad cholesterol (LDL), and increase the good (HDL). Diets too low in fat can negatively impact your cardiovascular health, damage cell membranes, and disrupt cell function. All fats in our food supply are a mixture of saturated, mono and poly unsaturated fats. Here’s a breakdown of some common fats:
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  • Wednesday, February 28, 2018 4:00 AM
    Spring is so close you can almost taste it – with highs in the 40s and 50s in the 10-day forecast, you can’t help but think that winter is probably (maybe?) over. With March just around the corner, the Purdue Extension office is getting excited for this year’s growing season! Check out the following events coming up in our area:
    Indiana Small Farm Conference – 3/1-3/18
    Purdue Extension is proud to present Indiana’s annual Small Farm Conference. The conference runs March 1 through 3 (Thursday, Friday and Saturday) this year. The conference features many exciting seminar topics, networking opportunities, and trade show exhibitors. Our featured keynote speaker is Chris Blanchard of the Farmer to Farmer Podcast and we’ll feature some new seminar topics this year, including a personal favorite of mine, culinary mushroom production. Be sure to register online – there are a variety of options available, such as single day registration or full conference registration at https://www.purdue.edu/dffs/smallfarms/home/small-farm-conference-2018/
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  • Wednesday, February 14, 2018 4:00 AM
    The flu is in the air, and temperatures are plummeting. The one thing that is sure to make anyone feel better? Soup. For a hearty, feel-good soup, I recommend adding aromatic vegetables. These deliver deep, bold flavors along with an aromatic punch that’ll leave your mouth watering. These flavors and aromas are released from vegetables like onions, garlic, chilies, and ginger when they are heated and crushed. Not only are these vegetables delicious and fragrant, they naturally reduce fat, sugar, and salt in your recipes while boosting your immune system. 
    No recipe? No problem! Simply start by adding evenly cut fresh vegetables from the list below. Heat up a small amount of oil, broth, or water. Smell that yet? Now’s the time to add additional broth, meat, grains, and vegetables of your choice. Let that simmer for about 30 minutes and serve with your desired garnish. 
    • Carrots are high in beta carotene and helps control the immune system. Cooked carrots allow better absorption of beta carotene. 
    • Celery is way more than just a low calorie snack- it’s a good source of Vitamins A, C, K, and potassium! You can also find heart-healthy properties in this crunchy morsel. 
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  • Thursday, February 8, 2018 4:00 AM
    New to the 4-H program and have questions? Finished your first year in 4-H and still have questions? Then join us for the “New 4-H Member Orientation” on Thursday, Feb. 15 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Montgomery County 4-H Fairgrounds in the Exhibit Hall. This is a great opportunity to learn about 4-H Trips and Opportunities, Projects, Green Record Books, and get all of your questions answered. The goal of this orientation is to get your 4-H experience started off on the right foot!
    This orientation is just for youth in their 1st or 2nd year of 4-H and are currently in grades 3-12. Please come with any questions that you have and learn about the great opportunities that youth can be a part of through the 4-H program. We will also have a panel of 10-year 4-H members available to answer questions and share their unique 4-H experiences. 
    Please RSVP for this orientation by calling the Extension office at (765)364-6363 or e-mail Abby Morgan at asweet@purdue.edu. RSVP’s must be made by February 13th. Refreshments will be provided. Participants will be getting a packet of information so please be sure to RSVP so I know how many packets to put together. Parents/guardians are welcome and encouraged to attend!
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  • Wednesday, February 7, 2018 4:00 AM
    Small-scale farming has become an increasingly important part of Indiana’s $11.2 billion agricultural industry. According to the 2012 U.S. Census of Agriculture, approximately 75 percent of Hoosier farms were less than 180 acres. Other studies show that nearly half the farms in the state are 50 acres or fewer.
    The annual Indiana Small Farm Conference and trade show provides both novice and experienced small-scale producers with an opportunity to learn about the latest trends, network with fellow farmers and get practical, hands-on guidance from nationally recognized experts on a wide range of critical topics, from crop production and equipment to marketing, new business development and legal issues.
    Registration is now open for this year’s conference, scheduled for March 1-3 at the Hendricks County 4-H Fairgrounds and Conference Complex, 1900 E. Main Street, Danville.
    “We’ve experienced tremendous growth in the five years we’ve hosted the conference,” said Michael O’Donnell, Purdue Extension diversified and organic agriculture educator and one of the event organizers. “It’s very gratifying that we’ve been able to expand our educational offerings and build such rewarding partnerships to better serve the small-scale farming community.”
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The Paper of Montgomery County,
a division of Sagamore News Media 
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