The Paper photo by Ron R. Keedy
Pictured left to right Nikki Stigall, Claire Sennett, Lilly Graham, and Olivia Williamson from Sommer Elementary.
The Paper photo by Ron R. Keedy Pictured left to right Nikki Stigall, Claire Sennett, Lilly Graham, and Olivia Williamson from Sommer Elementary.
There’s nothing like the excitement of youngsters when, after weeks of hard work, they get to strut their stuff in front of an appreciative audience. So it was with the 29 classes and teachers of Montgomery County Schools who received grants from the Montgomery County Education Foundation at the 2019 MCEF Grant Breakfast held Thursday at the Crawfordsville District Public Library.
Brad Monts, treasurer of the MCEF, told the Paper, “This year we awarded $29,173 in grant money. Over the last 27 years, we have given $332,000 in grants. As you can see, this year’s event is so big we are using three large rooms here at the library.”
Little Nathan Smalley hails from the New Market Literacy and Speech Preschool under the direction of Karen Selby, Speech and Language Pathologist. Selby tells us, “Nathan’s project is a study of trains and the sounds a train makes. We focus on students who are slightly behind in literacy and speech development. We use our grant money to buy games, toys and activities geared toward speech and reading development.”
Sharron Hudson, 6th & 7th grade teacher at Crawfordsville Middle School steered her students toward a project they called “Science Stuff.” “Thank goodness for this grant,” she said, “because there is never any money to buy science equipment. Now we have enough funding to buy some brand new Bracken Wave Generators (a device used to demonstrate wavelength and amplitude) and lots of other good “science stuff!”
Scooting under and around the tables and across the carpet, the New Market 5th graders, along with teacher Sharon Albertson, put together a lively, colorful and musical project they call “Coding Do, Re, Me with Dash Xylophone Robots.” Albertson told The Paper, “You can never start early enough to teach computer coding. This procedure is scaled down to the student’s abilities and the more color, sound and movement in a project the more fascinated and interested they become.”
In addition to all the learning, students from all over the county came together, exchanged smiles, giggles and ideas and left as newfound friends. Money well spent.