An image.
Home | The Paper | Subscribe | Contact Us | Community Events
Monday, November 19, 2018
  • You are here:
  •  : 
  •  : 
  • letters to the editor
  • Monday, November 12, 2018 8:21 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won by a big margin in New York along with the flipping of at least 33 additional house seats to Democrats. 7 States also flipped to Dem governors. There are now over 100 women in congress. The political situation may not get better acutely but the more women involved will make the political situation better within a year.
    Tobi Beck lost against insurmountable odds. Gerrymandering has reconstructed Indiana. Donnley’s lost was just shameful to our state. We can be better than this.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, November 7, 2018 8:22 PM
    Dear Editor,
    On behalf of Dusk-to-Dawn Bereavement Services, I want to express much thanks and appreciation to all those who joined together to make our 2018 Harvest Festival such a great success! Together, we raised nearly $2100 to help provide much needed counseling services to those in our community who are suffering loss. 
    Thanks goes out to the many individuals and merchants who donated goods and services for our silent auction: The Indianapolis COLTS, the Indianapolis Indians, Dr Steven Ruff, Puritan Water Conditioning, C.S. Oats Accountancy Corp, China Inn, Little Mexico, Terresa Hatke, agent with Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance, Sandy Simmons, Attitudes Family Hair Care, Culver’s, The Hairloom, Town & Country Homecenter, Buffalo Wild Wings, Brothers Pizza Company, Milligan’s Flowers & Gifts, The Homestead, Essential Hair Studio, Davidson’s Greenhouse, In His Time, B & R Fire Protection, Allen’s Country Kitchen, Carnegie Museum, Kroger, Heathcliff, Hachette Books, Pizza Hut, Expresso to Go & the Parthenon, Jimmy John’s, North Montgomery School Corporation, Sailor’s Valentine Creations, Linda Cherry, Elly Anderson & Louisa Blaich, Quilter’s Ridge by Judy Hoke, Becky Ottinger, Jazzy Jewelry by MaryLou Dawald, Hoosier Baskets by Peggy Boyd, Rachel Boyd, representative with Young Living Essential Oils, Susie Campbell of Campbell Clay, Precious Paws Pet Salon, Sugar Creek Animal Hospital, ACE Hardware, Indy Eleven, The Fever, Just Because, Angel Kizer, Carol Laursen, Backstep Brewing Company, Tipnotik Nail Studio, Marvin & Marilyn Rode, Catherine Knowling, Goody’s, Cracker Barrel, AHW, Tonya McMullen Candles with Jewelry Representative, Linda Airey, Robin’s Catering & Woodcrafts, Paige Hewitt Mary Kay representative, Knit-Kins, and an anonymous donor. And very special “Thank you” goes out to Dana Fisher, Linda Cherry, Diana Bell, and Cindy Wrightsman, who created the beautiful quilts for our raffle.
    0 comment(s)
  • Monday, November 5, 2018 8:39 PM
    Dear Editor,
    In the local debate over bringing wind farms to this county many issues have been considered: safety, health, property values, property rights, financial benefits for the community, relative effectiveness of wind power, contributions to the fight against global warming, impact on local wildlife.
    All these are serious and worthy considerations but ultimately what should matter most to all of us is quality of life. What defines quality of life? If you live in an urban or suburban setting, you probably define quality of life as access to services and amenities such as entertainments, recreational facilities, shopping, parks, close by medical care, cultural institutions, a variety of restaurants, proximity of schools, sports teams, etc. On a day to day basis, this laundry list of amenities may fluctuate but there is always the potential for a rebound.
    Given that the rural community has none of the amenities valued in suburban and urban life, what defines our quality of life? It is defined by the harmonious balance between man, nature and animals, a peaceful bucolic landscape and the deeply rooted bond between generations of farming families. Just being able to view an unspoiled sunset each day, the path of migrating birds or a pheasant meandering across an open field represents a large part of quality of life to those in our rural areas.
    0 comment(s)
  • Monday, November 5, 2018 8:39 PM

    Dear Editor

    The tragedy in Rochester is unimaginable – three siblings dead and another seriously injured. These aren’t the only victims – their families, the bus driver and student witnesses, their schoolmates and teachers. The ripple effects touch everyone. 
    While all fingers point to the truck’s driver, a major culprit goes unrecognized – Indiana’s morning darkness. Sunrise on Oct. 30 was 8:15. The children were struck at 7:15. If Indiana was in its correct Central Time Zone it would have been light outside and the children would have been visible. 
    The solar divide between the Eastern and Central time zones runs 25 miles east of Columbus, Ohio. In mid-1960’s Indiana’s time zone was re-designated from Central to Eastern but it was the adoption of Eastern Daylight Time in 2006 that caused the major shift in our sunlight schedule forcing children all over Indiana to travel to school in the dark. Students have been robbed, injured and killed by vehicles, and raped in morning darkness 

    0 comment(s)
  • Monday, November 5, 2018 8:38 PM
    Dear Editor,
    On October 27 and 28 the New Ross Players presented the play "Off The Track" at the New Ross Fire Station. For those of you who came to see the play, I thank you. The cast had a wonderfully fun time in using the talents god gave us. To see smiles and laughter in this time of so many troubles in the world is a blessing. 
    To put together a play, even in small town Indiana; it takes many people. Beth Binch did a fantastic job of directing, but she had a great deal of help from Maggie Woods as co-director. Maggie gave time to two events as she had a child in the play at Southmont that very same weekend. Behind the scenes were many leading up to that night. Jeremy Gearheart and Paula Robinson were stage managers; Sherry Whetstone handled lights, sound and camera; Melody Birt did the programs and tickets; Mike Zimmerman put the stage together; Randall Garrett was set design and creation; Diann Newell got us costumes; Pat Perry took pictures throughout practices and the play; Becky Lowe, Vicky Rogers, and Marty Routh were in charge of refreshments; the New Ross Fire Department for allowing us the use of the fire station; Mrs. French and Ms. Tolin for the use of the barn for practice. 
    These are just a few of the many people who supplied their time to make this play happen. Without so many giving people; even this small town event could not take place. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Sunday, November 4, 2018 7:30 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Mr. Heeke had an article in the newspaper about how great it is to have wind turbines near Spearville, Kansas. A good article and I don’t doubt his word. However, I would like to point out there is no comparison between the Spearville area and the Montgomery County area.
    How do I know? Several years ago, for 29 years, with a crew we harvested wheat in Alva, OK, Kansas, Nebraska and ended in Albion, Wy. Some years the route changed. I had insurance in Kansas, 50 miles north of Spearville, which is in the south west section of Kansas, about three fourths west across Kansas. I have never been to Spearville. I have been to Dodge City, 15 miles south of Spearville.
    The further you drive west in Kansas, the more open it is. Small towns and homesteads are further apart. Spearville has a population of under 1,000. Western Kansas is windy, wide open county. Many in the small town have limited work and limited income, little entertainment. Spearville is only 15 mils from Dodge City, a large town in Kansas. Garden City is about 50 miles. Another large town, both 25,000 plus. 
    Many small towns were dependent on cattle ranchers and wheat farmers. Also dependent, the merchants in town always asked about the rainfall. The wheat farmer worried about dry weather or even hail. The cattlemen and the wheat farmer depended on prices. If the wind turbines helped financially for Spearville, I would think it would certainly be welcome. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, November 1, 2018 9:59 PM
    Dear Editor,
    There is a battle going on in Montgomery County right now, that seems to have us divided. The wind farm issue is a very sensitive subject in our community. You hear all about how bad they are. Or how ugly they are. Or how much of a waste they are. But not very often do you hear about how good they are. Or the positive things it can bring to a community. I know the opposition is out there. They are all over the place. I believe there are people out there that support this issue, but don’t know how to express their support. I’ve taken part in many discussions on social media, but that’s not enough for me. I wanted to share my story. And it’s too much for a Facebook comment, so I’ve decided to share my story here. I grew up in a small farming community in Southwest Kansas. The town of Spearville is similar in size to Waynetown or Darlington.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, October 24, 2018 8:40 PM
    Dear Editor,
    During the campaign for the District 3 Council seat, northeast Montgomery County, my opponent’s team has described me as pro-wind turbine. Nothing could be further from the truth. 
    Let me set the record straight. I have opposed wind turbines from the beginning. I have also heard from the constituents I represent; overwhelmingly, they too are opposed to them. 
    I awaited a draft of the results of the views of over 1500 citizens from across the county who weighed in on the comprehensive plan. Once again, most of those citizens are opposed. 
    My opponent and I have differing views as for the future of Montgomery County; however, as for wind turbines we are on the same side. We oppose them.
    Mark Smith, 
    Crawfordsville
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, October 24, 2018 8:40 PM
    Dear Editor,
    I have read letters in the newspaper about the leadership abilities of incumbents Jim Fulwider and Mark Smith with his sheep and llamas and that is all well and good. But leadership implies that the people need led. Jim and Mark are trying to lead the citizens to zoning and not away from Wind Turbines in the rural areas. We live in a Republic in the USA. In a Republic we elect Representatives. That is what we need in Montgomery County. We need elected officials who will represent the citizens of the county, not lead us to their own political agendas. Ed Stephens and Greg Wilcox have made their simple platforms clear. No Wind Farms, No Zoning, selective spending and to listen to the will of the citizens, as Representatives. 
    Thank you,
    Rich Watkins,
    Linden
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, October 24, 2018 8:39 PM
    Dear Editor,
    You can view the following on You Tube, “Montgomery County Commissioners Meeting 8/27/2018 #159” starting at the 11:00 minute mark.
    For many years the public had the privilege of being able to address the commissioners on items of concern at the end of their public meetings.
    All of this changed with Resolution 2018-13 presented at the August 27, 2018 meeting. In one minute and 40 seconds the commissioners without any discussion voted unanimously to amend their meeting agenda, thus eliminating public comment at the end of their meetings.
    “Ask not what government can do for you, but what government is doing to you” Harry Browne.
    Richard DeWitt,
    Crawfordsville 
    0 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, October 23, 2018 9:09 PM
    Dear Editor,
    I am so sick and tired of the political commercials and mud slinging, that if Mickey Mouse or Donald Duck were running for Indiana Senate they would get my vote!
    Steve House
    Crawfordsville
    1 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, October 23, 2018 9:08 PM
    Dear Crawfordsville Community,
    Please allow me to take a few minutes of your time and introduce myself. My name is Jeff Bannon, and I am running for School Board, for the Crawfordsville Community School Corporation. 
    As a lifelong resident of the Crawfordsville Community, graduate of Crawfordsville High School, husband to a former Crawfordsville School Teacher (Amanda), and a father to three children in the school corporation (Abby 17, Alyx 14, and Henry 9); I feel it is my duty to serve in the area that is critically important to our community’s future, our youth. 
    I believe it is important to share with our community the reasons why I want to serve our community on the School Board. 
    1) Create a “Winning” Culture: For too long our society has adopted the mentality that mediocrity is acceptable. The fear of losing paralyzes many of our students from reaching their full potential, both in the classroom and on the athletic field. It is the job of the School Board to lead by example, to set standards for the administrators that define who they are as leaders. This will allow our students and teachers to be equipped with the tools needed to reach their full potential. John C. Maxwell wrote, “Everything rises and falls on Leadership”. Our schools are dealing with tough decisions; limited resources, state mandated standards, school violence, and many other important issues. One job of the School Board should be to lead with confidence through these difficult times. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, October 23, 2018 9:08 PM
    Dear Editor,
    I appreciate this opportunity to support my fellow Republicans as contested candidates for the Montgomery County offices of commissioner and council. Jim Fulwider has served this county for many years, first as a councilman and now a commissioner. He has committed himself to this community as a fireman and a public-office holder. Jim has a strong desire to make Montgomery County a better place to work and live for its residents. I had the privilege of serving with Jim on the council for a few years before pursuing my present position. My experience has shown me that Jim is fiscally conservative and will always educate himself on the issues before he makes a decision.
    I have also known Mark Smith for many years and am proud of him for expanding his service to this community by becoming a Montgomery County councilman. Mark has always had a servants heart. He has served and still serves multiple public and community groups in multiple capacities over the years. Mark also operates a successful agricultural business so he is aware of how difficult it is for taxpayers to support excessive government. Mark is fiscally conservative and fully informs himself on the issues facing the county to fund necessary services as efficiently as possible. I believe that he recognizes the responsibility of the council to expand the tax base by creating an economic environment in Montgomery County that will encourage employers to locate and expand job opportunities here. With more jobs comes more people moving to our community to settle down, and, yes, help fund county services. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Monday, October 22, 2018 10:06 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Isn’t it ironic that Mr. Donnelly has a truck load of boxes from Mr. Braun’s business? How did he get them? Isn’t it ironic that Mr. Donnelly gave up on the blue shirts, because he likes to also likes to wear blue? Isn’t it ironic that he also has to read his notes to say in-American? Isn’t it ironic that the ad shows Mr. Braun speaking, but the words don’t match the movement of his mouth? Isn’t it ironic that we hear how bad the other guy is, but we don’t know what they plan to do for the common Hoosier? What is their platform? Isn’t it ironic that our commissioners kind of change their tune come election time? Isn’t it ironic that we hear about decibels and distance, but it’s never mentioned about how much noise we have if there are ten or more wind turbines? Isn’t it ironic that Mr. Fulwider took the space of the comics in The Paper on Monday, and they didn’t appear for three days? I believe its time for change, not only in the state, but also in the county. Come November 6th, lets make the change. It’s time for Mr. Donnelly to go, and its also time to vote Ed Stephens and Greg Wilcox into office. Thanks. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Monday, October 22, 2018 10:05 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Once again, Commissioner John Frey and Commissioner Fulwider have displayed how difficult it is for them to work with other elected officials in our county. The inability of the Commissioners to work with the Council to finalize a budget just fills the residents of Montgomery County with a feeling of hope for our future! It was heartwarming to see how the Commissioners were willing to forgo a second pay increase in 4 years or willing to trim other areas in an attempt to cut their spending to make the County’s budget fall within the means of the taxpayers. Wait. They did none of that. 
    Commissioner Phil Bane has not been present at any of the 2019 Budget Meetings.
    Commissioner John Frey once again put on full display in his letter to the editor his disdain for the County Council. He calls them out for not supporting his ‘vision’ for our future in a letter to the Editor on 10/19/2018. John’s vision includes the 650 N TRAX road project, which coincidentally will be right by John’s home on 650 N. I wonder if a nice paved road will be included in that deal. Another ‘vision’ that John has shared is his ‘extended zoning’ plan which will take the 2 mile zoning radius surrounding Crawfordsville and extending it North, South and East. Guess where zoning stops north of town? Why, 650 N! John lucks out again! East will cover Nucor which we already knew and zoning south will completely engulf the town of New Market. There is a beautiful map showing this information and lucky for me, the Apex Clean Energy Wind Rep was nice enough to explain John’s new take on the Comprehensive Plan to me. I am somewhat shocked that the Wind Reps are working so closely with John on this plan which will affect us all. 'Coffee with the Commish' was quite educational!
    0 comment(s)
Looking for something older? Try our archive search
Copyright 2018
The Paper of Montgomery County,
a division of Sagamore News Media 
201 E. Jefferson Street
P.O. Box 272
Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933

 

Main:
Classifieds:
Fax:
(765) 361-0100
(765) 361-8888
(765) 361-5901
Advertising:
Editorial:
(765) 361-0100 Ext. 18
(765) 361-8888

Software © 1998-2018 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved
GO




Our app is now available!