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Saturday, January 19, 2019
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  • Friday, January 18, 2019 7:03 PM
    By Ethan Hollander
    Two years ago, Mayor Todd Barton convened the Crawfordsville Human Rights Commission, a group of citizens tasked with promoting a spirit of goodwill and equality among the city’s inhabitants. As we reach this milestone, I’m writing this open letter to update the community on our activities and to issue an appeal for your support and input.
    It’s been a busy two years indeed.
    The Commission’s first task was to review the city ordinances, which govern issues not already covered by state or federal law. The goal was to identify places where they needed to be updated or failed to match contemporary conceptions of human rights. After thorough review, we noted that the city’s list of protected classes made no mention of sexual orientation or gender identity. We recommended amending the city ordinances to address the omission, and the Common Council quickly and unanimously adopted our recommendation.
    This important step put Crawfordsville ahead of many communities like it in terms of its commitment to protecting human rights. In addition to simply being the right thing to do, we hope that this step will promote a positive image of our community and, in turn, make Crawfordsville an even more attractive location for economic development and investment.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, January 9, 2019 11:00 PM
    Dear Editor:
    Montgomery County Ordinance No. 2009-5 titled “An Ordinance to Regulate Wind Energy Conversion Systems” states the following:
    WHEREAS, property owners whose property is in close proximity to wind farms may not benefit financially from such facilities, but may be substantially affected by their construction, operation and maintenance; and
    WHEREAS, the construction, operation and maintenance of wind farms may also have a negative impact on the infrastructure of the County; and
    WHEREAS, the construction, operation and maintenance of wind farms may also have a negative impact on the environment and natural resources of the County; and
    WHEREAS, the construction of wind farms could limit certain types of development within proximity of the wind farms for other commercial/industrial purposes that could also create new jobs in the County.
    ___
    The two Wind Farms being proposed for our county are NOT COMMUNITY WIND FARMS. This means they will provide Montgomery County with ZERO electricity. The generated electricity is shipped off to the grid and sold to the contract holder.
    0 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, January 8, 2019 12:13 AM
    By Karissa Niehoff, Executive Director of the National Federation of State High School Associations and Bobby Cox, Commissioner of the Indiana High School Athletic Association. 
    If you are the mother or father of a high school athlete here in Indiana, this message is primarily for you. 
    When you attend an athletic event that involves your son or daughter, cheer to your heart’s content, enjoy the camaraderie that high school sports offer and have fun. But when it comes to verbally criticizing game officials or coaches, cool it. 
    Make no mistake about it. Your passion is admired, and your support of the hometown team is needed. But so is your self-control. Yelling, screaming and berating the officials humiliates your child, annoys those sitting around you, embarrasses your child’s school and is the primary reason Indiana has an alarming shortage of high school officials. 
    It’s true. According to a recent survey by the National Association of Sports Officials, more than 75 percent of all high school officials say “adult behavior” is the primary reason they quit. And 80 percent of all young officials hang up their stripes after just two years of whistle blowing. Why? They don’t need your abuse. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, January 8, 2019 12:11 AM
    Dear Editor,
    In one way or another, each of us is a representation of our environment. The attributes, qualities and values that people possess are representative of the generational values and those of the family; in addition, genetics and other factors, play a role, but things are changing. Expectations are changing and so is accountability. Most people want to know why something happens and most people are ready to tune in to their preferred source of information to be told why. Trust and optimism is important and it has its place, but too much optimism it is the newest drug. It is annoying and probably inversely correlated to trust of the government. Pessimism has its place in this disposable era of pseudo-censorship political correctness, perpetual politicians, and forced "morality" where we let others who know best tell us how we should live our lives.
    Before my teenage years, I remember a conversation my grandpa was having with his friend over the weekend sometime in the ’90s. That old catch-phrase surfaced, “they don't make things like they used to” on the topic that I believed to be simply about cars. It was about more than cars. I was oblivious to what was really being said, but I have come to realize, much more was being discussed than I could have realized at the time. I chimed in, surprised at the apparent ignorance of one of the most intelligent people I knew, that cars were getting better all the time. His subsequent response was not significant until too many years later. I did not see the value of interchangeable, universal parts as it related to their generation. The ramblings of a not even teenage kid on the specifications compared side by side were not even a contest, but to these two, who just chuckled, it was much more complicated than the parts of the car.
    0 comment(s)
  • Friday, December 28, 2018 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    Jefferson said that he would rather be exposed to the inconveniences of too much liberty than the inconveniences of having too little. There are many ways to kill or defend yourself, or anyone else. You might get your gun and call the police if an unlucky intruder finds his way into your line of fire. For others, they might just install some security system, get a dog, and hope for the best. For those that decide to arm themselves, and keep their weapon in a safe place, they might sleep just a bit easier than those who are not and must put their hopes in a timely police arrival or the after life. All US citizens are guaranteed this "right" but only when the law is followed.
    The Indiana red flag law is a violation of this 2nd Amendment "guarantee". The 2nd Amendment illustrates the "right" that "guarantees" as an "uninfringeable right" the people, to keep and bear arms. The red flag law allows for police that believe someone is dangerous, to seize your guns without due process, initially, based on an opinion, or perception, "professional", or not. 
    Perceptions, perceptions of motivations, memory, pretty much anything related to our human senses and memory is unreliable, anyway. Curtis Hill and others in government are pushing potentially well intentioned, but mind bending policy. The disarming of law abiding citizens, goes beyond the red flag law and becomes expensive when one restores their so called uninfringeable right. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, December 27, 2018 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    Every county resident, if possible, needs to take an interest in county government especially when those in government take an interest in you. This happened Tuesday evening, Dec. 18, at the Library.
    The meeting was set for 7 p.m., hoping those who work days would have a chance to come. Everyone had a chance to speak and the councilmen were good listeners. The councilmen must decide to rescind or not the ERA placed on Madison and Sugar Creek Townships. After five years of no activity, if rescinded, the process would need to start over. The councilmen will decide at their regular meeting, Jan. 8, 2019 at 9 a.m. at the Courthouse.
    I and others feel they would like to thank the councilmen publicly for the time chosen and listening closely to the people of the community.
    Bill Reed,
    Crawfordsville
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, December 19, 2018 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    After attending multiple presentations on the comprehensive plan, I feel it isn’t a clear representation of the county’s vison. While most of the presentation I agree with and support, this plan made it sound like Montgomery County overwhelmingly opposes wind energy. This simply isn’t true – a lot of people like wind energy. 
    Wind energy would be a big asset to Montgomery County and stimulate a lot of growth. I’ve seen it bring a dying community back to life. My concern is that there are a number of supporters out there that have not provided their feedback on this plan. The population of Montgomery County is roughly 35,000, and this plan is built around the feedback of less than 1 percent of those residents. That is a very small percentage of our county to rely on to represent the “will of the people.” Fortunately, there is still an opportunity to provide feedback before the plan is submitted for approval. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, December 19, 2018 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    Recently, I read an article in The Paper which put Spearville, Kansas in the news again. Spearville is located in Western Kansas where resources financially were limited. According to Mr. Heeke the wind energy companies have been great financially for the Spearville community. I don’t doubt it. I have never been to Spearville but have traveled close to the town. I have traveled most of Kansas harvesting or looking for work. Mr. Heeke seems very excited for his hometown and would like us to want the wind turbines. He is trying so hard to impress us to accept the turbines I am beginning to feel he is associated with the wind energy companies. 
    I do feel I understand Mr. Heeke’s excitement. I know it’s hard when you are short financially. Several years ago I harvested near Walsh, Colorado, a small one-block business district, down the road a piece from Spearville. Down the road a piece, a western term meaning 150 miles. Walsh, like Spearville, was short on finances. The county was windy and susty and the roads were dusty to travel making it tricky when meeting and passing a car or truck. They were roads anyone needs to get used to. However I enjoyed the people and the western attitude. I feel it’s not unfair to compare Walsh community with the Spearville community. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, December 13, 2018 8:52 PM
    Dear Editor,
    After attending the public meeting on Monday 12/10 at NMHS concerning the proposed planning & zoning plan for Montgomery County, it occurred to me just how a few hand selected people can drastically alter or dictate everyone else’s lives.
    This hand picked committee of 26 people chosen to represent all of Montgomery County, to my understanding, was selected by Commissioner John Frey. Five or more of those people are outspoken advocates for zoning and one, who doesn’t even live in this county, is making decisions for you and what you can/cannot do with your life. There may be a few committee members that have stated in the past that they aren’t in favor of planning & zoning but I feel that there is a flaw in this hand picked system and here’s a solution to that flaw.
    Have a committee made up of elected officials from each town AND each township. These are the people who are elected by the people to best represent Montgomery County as a whole, not just the wants and values of a select few. 
    1 comment(s)
  • Thursday, December 13, 2018 8:52 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Senator Phil Boots, I respectfully disagree with your current position on the Indiana Code 36-8-2-13 (IC 36-8-2-13). This code gives the towns and cities the authority to exercise extraterritorial powers for purposes of protecting “public health, safety and welfare”. I do not know if Senator Boots talked to both sides of this issue before taking a position. I regret that he is not respecting the health, safety and welfare of the public.
    The Legislative Services Agency (LSA) has verified the validity of this ordinance.
    With regard to the application of this ordinance to Industrial Wind Turbines (IWTs), there are very significant risks to health, safety and welfare. Construction of IWTs and the ongoing vibrations can have a wide impact on the nearby aquifer, thus affecting the well water of the cities and towns, as well as the wells and water softeners of individual residents in these municipalities.
    0 comment(s)
  • Monday, December 10, 2018 8:31 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Thank you to Phil Boots for validating the position of 13 small towns in the state of Indiana. If the small town ordinance adopted by Alamo and Darlington along with 11 other small towns in the state was illegal or unable to stand in court, there would be no reason to change the law on the state level.
    Miriah Mershon,
    Crawfordsville
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, December 5, 2018 8:57 PM
    Dear Editor,
    The Chamber of Commerce has come out in full support of Apex Roaming Bison's proposed industrial wind turbine project in Montgomery County. However, there are a few items that should be brought to light in regards to Apex as a local business. First of all, the commissioners have not approved their project proposal. Although Apex has been trying to convince the commissioners to sign an Economic Development Agreement for almost a year now, their proposal was denied in September. There have been no building permits for tower construction. Further, they may never be able to agree upon Apex's terms. In Ford County IL this year, Apex was asked to provide a simple letter of credit, which they were not able to produce. To consider Apex a Montgomery County Indiana business is not only inaccurate, it is also dangerous. When the commissioners first began to listen to local residents and discussed amending the 2009 wind ordinance, Apex immediately countered. Their response was for the commissioners to pay attention to what Apex wants, because they have invested too much in this community to walk away now. This was relayed by the commissioners to the no wind crowd as a threat of a lawsuit against the county. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Sunday, December 2, 2018 7:12 PM
    Dear Editor,
    A few weekends ago, a family member of mine passed away, so we went back for the funeral. It was a quick trip thanks to Mother Nature, but it was enough time to see plenty. The first day we were out there, of course my Dad wanted to drive around to see the Windmills. It’s been several years since I’ve been back, and a LOT has changed since the last time. On our way out of town, the first comment he made was about the roads, and how thankful he was. Not only did the wind companies fix the roads, they are in better shape now than they were before they moved in. There are now 3 energy companies that have turbines there. Kansas City Power and Light, Westar and Duke energy. As we drove by the main offices for Duke and Westar, there were 10-15 vehicles at each place. Take that times 3, that’s a LOT of jobs. Maybe not for a town the size of Crawfordsville, but for a small town like Waynetown, Alamo, Wingate, Darlington, that’s a LOT jobs. The loss of farm ground is very minimal. Most of the farmers like them because it gives them a good solid road in the field to load trucks on, hook/unhook heads, etc. I’ve worked on a farm here. A lot of that stuff is done on the road. Loading a truck on the road is dangerous and often a hinderance to other drivers. Many of our roads are very busy. I spent a lot of time sitting on the side of the road wondering if I was going to get hit. Allowing this to be done in the field would be so much better. During the drive, he pointed out several places where someone was going to build a house. Yes, you read that right. People are wanting to not only move there, but build a home there. There is one housing development currently in progress and another one in the works. I can’t speak for other places, but property values in Spearville and Ford County have not dropped. If anything they went up. 
    4 comment(s)
  • Friday, November 23, 2018 8:28 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Montgomery County had 2 candidates running for county commissioner and 2 candidates running for county council. All four candidates were very specifically against industrial wind turbines and in favor of acting to keep them out of the county. All four candidates for election were clear regarding their stand on wind turbines, and each intended to represent their constituents against wind turbines. (I thank each one of your for that.) Yet, Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce has rolled out the red carpet for APEX (Roaming Bison), a wind turbine company. It seems that the Chamber of Commerce has missed the fact that there are many businesses in the country that they have not rolled out the red carpet for. The Chamber of Commerce has also failed to consider that the over 1600 adults of the Montgomery County have signed a petition to make their voice heard and that they do not desire to have an industrial wind turbine plant in our county. Many families have spoken that they will leave the community if industrial wind turbines come… with that goes families who shop locally and their small businesses. The elected government officials have spoken against having an industrial wind plant in the county, so why is the Chamber in direct conflict with the elected officials? Chamber, please listen to the People of Montgomery County.
    1 comment(s)
  • Monday, November 19, 2018 8:21 PM
    Dear Editor,
    In the past 2 years, over 1600 signatures, mostly of folks in rural Montgomery County have signed a petition expressing that they do not wish to be in the midst of an industrial wind turbine (IWT) facility. Yet, in the past 2 years, few people in the towns have said much, particularly in Crawfordsville. It seems the biggest proponents for IWTs are those whom reside in Crawfordsville. After all, with the higher density of population in city limits, there is more electricity consumed there. So, I encourage the folks that live in town, to ask your city council to bring IWTs into the town, close to the consumers! There is lots of greenspaces . . . Milligan Park, the new Pike Place Park, Elston Park (very close to CLEP), there is also ample space in the Crawfordsville Municipal Golf Course and the Crawfordsville Country Club, as well as the industrial park by Ivy Tech. What better way to bring green energy right close to the consumers than to place IWTs right in the middle of town. They can reach to 1000ft into the air, so would be well above any close by buildings. If they cannot place then in town, please insist on understanding why they will not do so.
    0 comment(s)
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The Paper of Montgomery County,
a division of Sagamore News Media 
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Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933

 

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