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Tuesday, April 24, 2018

  • Thursday, April 19, 2018 4:00 AM
    Throughout the month of April, Prevent Child Abuse Indiana and the Child Abuse Prevention Council of Montgomery County, a program of the Youth Service Bureau, reminds Montgomery County residents that helping our communities and families create healthy, nurturing environments for children is one of the best investments we can make! 
    We all know that child abuse and neglect exists in every zip code. It is a serious problem with solutions that do not receive the attention they deserve. There is something every single one of us can do to prevent it. We hope that Montgomery County will join the thousands of other communities, organizations and individuals across our nation who are putting children first and are working to promote the prevention of child abuse and neglect.
    Scientists who study the brain tell us that providing all of our children, from infants to adolescents, with nurturing relationships in safe, stable environments builds healthy brain architecture and lays a foundation for future success and well-being. Nevertheless, too many Indiana children are living in environments that undermine healthy brain development. Children who are abused or neglected, living in homes with domestic violence or substance abuse or living in chronic poverty, experience unhealthy levels of stress that are toxic to the brain and impair its growth. These children are more likely to experience life-long problems in learning, behavior and physical and mental health. 
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  • Thursday, April 12, 2018 4:00 AM
    Jacob Moore is setting out on a 5,000 mile cross-country bicycle ride to raise money for his organization ScholarShopAfrica. He is writing a blog along the way and you can find updates in The Paper along the journey.
    By Jacob Moore
    "ON THE PRICE IS RIGHT!" A childhood dream came true! I went on the set of The Price is Right. It was definitely a unique experience and one I will never forget. 
    That morning started off with a rush and never slowed down. First, I was riding to meet a friend for breakfast when a bolt on my chain fender broke and instead of removing the other screw, I just mangled the fender so it would not rub on the chain. Luckily, the Pedal Assist still worked and I made breakfast on time. After, I put my gear in her car, got on the bike, the motor went out! Which means the PAS (Pedal Assist System) wouldn’t work, so 100 percent leg had to be used. It's harder to pedal than a normal bike because the hub is in the rear tire. I got to the bike to the shop and they told me there was nothing they could do unless I changed the rear tire out. Thus, I left it with them while I found out logistics for the rear tire. 
    No worries it’s The Price is Right day!! I went to print my ticket for the show and while re-reading the fine print I saw white shirts were frowned upon . . . guess what?!
    Yep, you guessed it!
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  • Wednesday, April 11, 2018 4:00 AM
    Improving our state’s workforce has been and will continue to be a top priority for our state, as more than one million jobs are expected to open in Indiana over the next decade when more baby boomers retire and additional companies choose to grow or locate in our state.
    During the 2018 session, the Senate and House of Representatives authored bills that work together to enhance our workforce development efforts, and Gov. Eric Holcomb included the topic on his 2018 agenda.
    Senate Enrolled Act 50 improves how workforce development is overseen in Indiana by creating the Governor’s Workforce Cabinet. This will replace the previous 43-member workforce governing body with a more nimble, decisive and accountable board that will streamline our job-training efforts. SEA 50 also increases students’ access to career coaches to help them identify career paths.
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  • Numbers show fire department has been busy
    Saturday, April 7, 2018 4:00 AM
    This month we would like to briefly take the time and discuss last year’s calls for fire and EMS service by the Crawfordsville Fire Department. 
    Our 2017 run volume shows a very busy year for the Crawfordsville Fire Department. Our mission statement is to “Prevent or minimize the loss of life and private property through education an intervention to the satisfaction of those we serve in a safe, efficient, professional, and innovative manner.” The department takes this mission statement very seriously and responded to it in record-breaking numbers last year.
    The Crawfordsville Fire Department provides fire and EMS services to the City of Crawfordsville and Union Township. Total square miles covered by the department is 111.88, with a population of 24,587 people. The Crawfordsville Fire Department also has contracts with Brown and Ripley Townships for EMS service. Department operations are conducted out of our two fire stations. Station1 is centrally located at 100 S. Water St., while Station 2 is located on the east side of the city at 1509 E. Main St.
    After going through our incident records it shows the department’s fire and EMS run numbers have continued climb slowly for the past five years. The following are total numbers for service by the Crawfordsville Fire Department.
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  • Tuesday, April 3, 2018 4:00 AM
    Jacob Moore is setting out on a 5,000 mile cross-country bicycle ride to raise money for his organization ScholarShopAfrica. He is writing a blog along the way and you can find updates in The Paper along the journey.
    By Jacob Moore
    Blogging this now, as I have had sketchy internet and have had many miles to ride. Enjoy!
    It is currently 8:45 p.m. on March 22 very chilly and I am sitting by the fireside. The crackle of the red woods alongside the hoot of an owl makes one wonder why we ever developed and invented technology. This is life. My eyes burn of smoke from blowing the fire, all my senses are on alert, the air smells of burning redwood, and my eyes keep gazing up at the marvelous amount of stars glittering the sky. There is a little opening in between the redwoods where I can see the heavens above and I'm thanking my lucky stars for beautiful weather. More on this in a few . . .
    Today, as I was doing my morning routine I felt an Earthquake 4.6 magnitude about an hour South of where I am staying. I hadn't taken off on my trip and was startled by the house shaking along with the toilet. (TMI?) But imagine sitting down and there's a pretty large rattle beneath you. The lyrics shake, rattle, and roll definitely popped into my head along with my eyes popping out for sure. There is supposed to be a massive quake within my lifetime that will cause a tsunami and wipe out entire cities and cause massive flooding. It amazes me people still choose to live here with that being inevitable, but if you saw the beauty of the redwoods, smelled the fresh air, and felt the cool ocean breeze from the coast brush up against your face like the flicker of a cats tail you'd most likely stay put as well. A new understanding of west coastal living, I suppose. We have tornadoes in Indiana, but feeling the power of an Earthquake a few miles away makes me be in awe at how small and feeble we are compared to nature and Mother Earth.
    As I set the camp fire, the wind is beginning to change directions and the temperature is dropping. A plume of smoke just dance its way under my nose bringing along the aroma of burning redwood filling the night sky which brought me out of thinking about this morning . . . I am sitting here looking at my shelter and belongings: a single man tent, BeachFlyer, and two panniers holding my clothes, tablets, chargers, and bike tools.
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  • Tuesday, April 3, 2018 4:00 AM
    Growing up is hard work! Children today face problems we never dreamed of when we were young. Having a mentor can make the difference as to whether or not a child succeeds in developing the self-esteem and confidence necessary to grow into a healthy, productive adult. While we have many wonderful, caring volunteers in the program, we also have a waiting list of 17 children hoping to be paired with a mentor. Because of this, the Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau, JUMP Program (Juvenile Mentoring Program) is running a series of articles about the children who are on the waiting list hoping to be matched with an adult volunteer. Their names have been changed and their age changed slightly so that they may remain anonymous!
    One of these children on the waiting list is a 10-year-old girl named Kelsey. Kelsey lives in a single parent home with her father and one older brother. Dad works full time and worries he doesn’t have enough time and attention to give Kelsey all the things she needs. He recently went through a divorce and stated that Kelsey made excellent grades until her step mom left the picture. He describes Kelsey as very smart and funny and if she cares about someone, she will do just about anything for him or her. She loves to play with beads, make slime, ride bikes and play basketball and volleyball.
    Kelsey said she would like to have a mentor to have a female to talk to since she lives with only males in her household. If she had a mentor, she would like to hike, swim, go to parks and to the mall. She also likes fishing, dancing, going to museums, playing with animals and doing hair. When she grows up she would like to be a doctor and her favorite day would be one spent at the mall and then going to the China Buffet. 
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  • Monday, March 26, 2018 4:00 AM
    Growing up is hard work! Children today face problems we never dreamed of when we were young. Having a mentor can make the difference as to whether or not a child succeeds in developing the self-esteem and confidence necessary to grow into a healthy, productive adult. While we have many wonderful, caring volunteers in the program, we also have a waiting list of 17 children hoping to be paired with a mentor. Because of this, the Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau, JUMP Program (Juvenile Mentoring Program) is running a series of articles about the children who are on the waiting list hoping to be matched with an adult volunteer. Their names have been changed and their age changed slightly so that they may remain anonymous!
    One young boy who is on our waiting list is David. David is a 9-year-old boy that lives north of Crawfordsville with his grandparents, one of which is terminally ill. He has lost many people who were dear to him in his young life and is about to lose another. His grandmother is worried he will fall through the cracks during this difficult time and hopes he can be matched with a mentor. She believes it will be good for him to get out of the house, have someone else to talk to and get some one on one attention.
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  •   What exactly is economic development?
    Saturday, March 24, 2018 4:00 AM
    Editor’s Note: This is the fourth in the ongoing series about collaborative economic and community development efforts between the City of Crawfordsville, County Commissioners, and County Redevelopment Commission. This month the focus is on economic development. 
    By Cheryl Morphew, President of CRMorphew Consulting LLC
    For a few months now, this column has described some of the key components of building a vibrant local community and economy. Many of which are part of a larger economic development strategy for Crawfordsville and Montgomery County. For some, you may be wondering what exactly is economic development and why should I care? 
    There are many definitions of economic development, including: job creation, wealth creation, new tax revenue, and an improved standard of living. While it may be all of these, it is so much more. In fact, it is different for every community and there is no “one size fits all” plan. Each community develops their own vision for the future and establishes the necessary goals to see that vision to fruition. Ideally, the strategies are sustainable and will lead to an environment which is conducive to job creation & retention, increased tax base, and enhancements to local quality of life. Finally, it is collaborative and driven by both public investment (infrastructure, roads, etc.) and private business. 
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  • Last day in Washington for Jacob Moore
    Friday, March 23, 2018 4:00 AM
    Jacob Moore is setting out on a 5,000 mile cross-country bicycle ride to raise money for his organization ScholarShopAfrica. He is writing a blog along the way and you can find updates in The Paper along the journey
    By Jacob Moore
    The second day of my ride was a gorgeous 68 mile trip to Castle Rock, Oregon. I am still getting used to the bike and its batteries which almost got me in trouble. Riding most of day 1 on the highest gears and using max battery power (making up lost time) I thought they’d go forever. I was in the top gear on both the PAS (Pedal Assist) and normal gears (7 speed) for roughly 15 miles and I finished with battery juice still remaining. Turns out uphills and climbs . . . use a lotttttt more battery power especially when its 225+ pounds.
    The second day started out lovely, nice weather, sunny, a bit chilly but that is to be expected on a mid-March day in Oregon. My wonderful hosts served me an excellent breakfast that included fruit, a bagel, sunny side up egg, and cheese. I packed my bags and they sent me off with a packed lunch. The ride was great and about 3/4 of the way I stopped to eat my packed lunch. I hadn’t seen a car for awhile and there was one medium sized white farm house off in the horizon. Surrounding me was lush green farm land and a river rushing in front of me. A light drizzle continued to wet my face, but the sun reminded me it was only showers of blessings. After eating my lunch that consisted of bean tortilla with pico de gallo sauce (delicious) and carrots, apples, radishes, celery I was off for the final 20 miles.
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  • Bare hand contact can prove to be issue
    Wednesday, March 21, 2018 4:00 AM
    Hands are covered in germs. All hands; including the hands of doctors, dentists, teachers, food workers, and even you and I, are covered in germs. In restaurants, these germs can be transferred from the hands of food workers to the food and can spread foodborne illnesses. In fact, according to the CDC, bare hand contact with ready-to-eat foods is the cause of 30 percent of illness outbreaks associated with restaurants. While handwashing is required and helpful in destroying most of these germs found on hands, gloves provide the extra barrier that is necessary for foods that will not be washed or cooked before being served to the public.
    The FDA Food Code, which has been adopted by the state of Indiana, prohibits bare hand contact with ready-to-eat foods because they are intended to be eaten without any additional washing or cooking and the germs that are commonly found on hands can cause illnesses if consumed. Local health departments enforce these regulations; however, the Food Code does not prohibit bare hand contact with foods that will be cooked because heating foods at high temperatures destroys any germs that could have been transferred to that product during preparation.
    Food service workers that are preparing foods such as salads, raw vegetables, or sandwiches must, by law, wear gloves while doing so; however, food service workers that are preparing foods that will be cooked are not required to wear gloves while doing so and are not putting the public at risk of illness by touching these foods. For instance, when dining at the local pizza place, it is common to see the pizza maker touch the dough and toppings with bare hands. This is not a Food Code violation because the pizza is going to be heated to a temperature that will kill any germs that were potentially transferred from the worker’s hands to the food and will not make anyone sick.
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  • Monday, March 19, 2018 4:00 AM
    Growing up is hard work! Children today face problems we never dreamed of when we were young. Having a mentor can make the difference as to whether or not a child succeeds in developing the self-esteem and confidence necessary to grow into a healthy, productive adult. While we have many wonderful, caring volunteers in the program, we also have a waiting list of 17 children hoping to be paired with a mentor. Because of this, the Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau, JUMP Program (Juvenile Mentoring Program) is running a series of articles about the children who are on the waiting list hoping to be matched with an adult volunteer. Their names have been changed and their age changed slightly so that they may remain anonymous!
    Sara is an 8-year-old girl who lives in a home with her father, his fiancé and 2 other siblings. She lives outside of Crawfordsville in the South district. Her father would like her to have a mentor so she can learn more social skills, coping skills and as a way to release her energy. Since this is a new blended family, Sara’s dad feels she needs someone to spend one on one time with her so she can get attention from someone who is specifically there for her! He describes Sara as creative in that she likes to make up stories, write books and do craft projects. She does well in school and catches on to things very quickly.
    Sara said she wants to have a mentor to do fun things with her. She likes to go to the splash pad, play at the park, do crafts, dress up, go bike riding, play with dolls and eat at McDonald’s or Steak n Shake. When she grows up, she would like to do something with art or work in an ice cream shop! At school, she played volleyball and basketball and loves to do anything outdoors.
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  • Saturday, March 17, 2018 4:00 AM
    The Indiana General Assembly concluded the 2018 session Wednesday, wrapping up nearly three months of researching, listening to testimony, and authoring and voting on legislation.
    Below are some of the topics we focused on this session, along with the related bills we passed to make Indiana a better place to live, work and raise a family.
    Funding Community Mental Health Centers
    House Enrolled Act 1141 updates the way county funding for community mental health centers is calculated and administered. This will ensure that the community mental health centers receive the appropriate amount of local support to continue serving their communities.
    Fighting the Drug Epidemic
    Senate Enrolled Act 221 helps prevent opioid abuse by requiring doctors to check INSPECT, Indiana’s prescription-monitoring service, when prescribing opioids to a patient. By checking the program, prescribers will see if a patient already has an opioid prescription from another provider or has a history of excessive opioid use.
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  • Saturday, March 17, 2018 4:00 AM
    Jacob Moore is setting out on a 5,000 mile cross-country bicycle ride to raise money for his organization ScholarShopAfrica. He is writing a blog along the way and you can find updates in The Paper along the journey
    By Jacob Moore
    This is the philosophy many Peace Corps and Cameroonians follow. In french they may say "C'est la vie" (That is life). In the United States we say it's the 80/20 principle or "Perfect is the enemy of good."
    As I lay here in bed at 1:45 the morning of my trip many people ask me if I am ready. My answer? No. I am never ready . . . for anything. Hence the big pile of material still humped on the ground next to me or my last minute purchase of sunscreen even though 1 million and 1 people told me to buy it. My procrastination may drive people crazy, ahem my mother, but I look at it as I am spending more time with the people I love. Packing after dark when the TV has been turned off and stories have finished being told is my time to shine! Yes, I may be tired the next day, but I am alone by myself with my thoughts.
    That is exactly what I am doing now. Sitting alone with my thoughts and writing them down for the world to read.
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  • Monday, March 12, 2018 4:00 AM
    The Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau, JUMP Program (Juvenile Mentoring Program) will be running a series of articles about the children who are on the waiting list hoping to be matched with a caring adult volunteer. Their names have been changed and their age changed slightly so that they may remain anonymous!
    The Montgomery County Youth Service Bureau needs people like you to volunteer to become a mentor (like a big brother/sister) to one of our many youth who are on our ever-growing waiting list. Studies have shown that the consistent, enduring presence of a caring adult in a young person’s life can be the difference between staying in school or dropping out, making healthy decisions or engaging in risky behavior, and realizing one’s potential or failing to achieve one’s dreams. Mentors can make a profound difference in the lives of their mentees- and in turn, strengthen our communities, economy and country!
    One such child on our waiting list is Beth. Beth is 9 years old and lives with her father/step mother and 3 siblings in the south district. Her stepmother describes her as easy going, outgoing and someone who is always up for anything! She stated that Beth very seldom gets into trouble and does very well in school. She said Beth likes to do almost anything including playing outside, cooking and playing volleyball. 
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  • Friday, March 9, 2018 4:00 AM
    Last month, a tragic mass shooting occurred at a school in Florida, and since then, preventing gun violence has become a renewed topic of discussion nationwide.
    It is important for Hoosiers to know that Indiana has a number of policies in place to help protect our students and teachers.
    We are one of only five states that has a “Red Flag” law, which has been in place since 2005 and is now being considered as a model for other states.
    Under the law, police officers can seize firearms with court supervision from people if they believe the person presents a risk to themselves or others, has a mental illness, has a propensity for violence or is emotionally unstable. The law also includes procedures to ensure law enforcement officers cannot wrongly abuse their ability to seize guns.
    In addition to the “Red Flag” law, we have a number of resources available for Indiana school districts, including grant funding, school safety specialists and active shooter training.
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The Paper of Montgomery County,
a division of Sagamore News Media 
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P.O. Box 272
Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933

 

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